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Effect of a school-based active play intervention on sedentary time and physical activity in preschool children

O'Dwyer, M. V., Fairclough, S. J., Ridgers, N. D., Knowles, Z. R., Foweather, L. and Stratton, G. 2013, Effect of a school-based active play intervention on sedentary time and physical activity in preschool children, Health education research, vol. 28, no. 6, pp. 931-942, doi: 10.1093/her/cyt097.

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Title Effect of a school-based active play intervention on sedentary time and physical activity in preschool children
Author(s) O'Dwyer, M. V.
Fairclough, S. J.
Ridgers, N. D.ORCID iD for Ridgers, N. D. orcid.org/0000-0001-5713-3515
Knowles, Z. R.
Foweather, L.
Stratton, G.
Journal name Health education research
Volume number 28
Issue number 6
Start page 931
End page 942
Total pages 12
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2013
ISSN 0268-1153
1465-3648
Keyword(s) physical activity
lack of exercise
child
preschool child
accelerometers
preschool
Summary Early childhood is a critical time for promoting physical activity. Few studies have investigated the effect of interventions in this population. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a school-based active play intervention on preschool children’s sedentary time and physical activity. Preschool children were recruited from randomly selected preschools. Schools were randomly assigned to an intervention or comparison group. One teacher per intervention school received training from active play professionals in the delivery of a 6-week active play programme. Comparison schools continued their usual practice. Children wore a uni-axial accelerometer for 7 days at baseline, immediately after and at 6-month post-intervention. No significant intervention effects were observed for sedentary time or physical activity. However, sex and hours spent at school were significant predictors of physical activity. Children who spent fewer hours (half-day children) at school were significantly more active than their full-day counterparts. Physical activity during the intervention classes was high even though neither daily physical activity nor sedentary time changed. Notably children who spent more time at preschool were less active suggesting that preschool was not as conducive to physical activity engagement as other environments.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/her/cyt097
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Free to Read Start Date 2015-01-01
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30059436

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Created: Thu, 09 Jan 2014, 14:55:24 EST by Jane Moschetti

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.