You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Food Product Information: Trusted Sources and Delivery Media

Chan, Caroline, Kam, Booi, Coulthard, Darryl, Pereira, Steven and Button, Philip 2013, Food Product Information: Trusted Sources and Delivery Media, in ACIS 2013 : Proceedings of the 24th Australasian Conference on Information Systems, RMIT, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 1-13.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
coulthard-foodproduct-2013.pdf Published version application/pdf 621.09KB 207

Title Food Product Information: Trusted Sources and Delivery Media
Author(s) Chan, Caroline
Kam, Booi
Coulthard, Darryl
Pereira, Steven
Button, Philip
Conference name ACIS Australasian Conference on Information Systems (24th : 2013 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 4-6 Dec. 2013
Title of proceedings ACIS 2013 : Proceedings of the 24th Australasian Conference on Information Systems
Editor(s) [unknown]
Publication date 2013
Conference series Australasian Conference on Information Systems
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher RMIT
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Keyword(s) Food information
Electronic consumers
Food label
Extended product information
Trusted source
Summary Consumers receive food-related information from various sources and strive to make informed food choices regarding their health, lifestyle and belief. To be effective and reliable, the information consumers receive needs to be from a credible source and delivered to them in a way they trust. The aim of this study was to investigate the sources and media channels of that information consumer trust. An online and hardcopy survey of 298 consumers currently living in Australia was carried out. Many consumers believe that the source of food product information is important (87%). As a source of general and nutritional information, Health Professionals, Scientists and Government sources are the most trusted sources, with at least 80% of participants confident of the information coming from these sources. Retailer advertising and social media are the least trusted sources with just 29% and 11%, respectively, confident of these sources. As a delivery medium, printed food labels (67%) and printed brochures or fact sheets (56%) remain the most trusted delivery media compared with electronic media, such as mobile phone or the Internet.
Language eng
Field of Research 080602
Socio Economic Objective 890399
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2013, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30059456

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 148 Abstract Views, 211 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 10 Jan 2014, 12:33:25 EST by Katrina Fleming

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.