Maternal and early postnatal nutrition and mental health of offspring by age 5 years: a prospective cohort study clinical guidance

Jacka, Felice N., Ystrom, Eivind, Brantsaeter, Anne Lise, Karevold, Evalill, Roth, Christine, Haugen, Margaretha, Meltzer, Helle Margrete, Schjolberg, Synnve and Berk, Michael 2013, Maternal and early postnatal nutrition and mental health of offspring by age 5 years: a prospective cohort study clinical guidance, Journal of the American academy of child & pdolescent psychiatry, vol. 52, no. 10, pp. 1038-1047.

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Title Maternal and early postnatal nutrition and mental health of offspring by age 5 years: a prospective cohort study clinical guidance
Author(s) Jacka, Felice N.
Ystrom, Eivind
Brantsaeter, Anne Lise
Karevold, Evalill
Roth, Christine
Haugen, Margaretha
Meltzer, Helle Margrete
Schjolberg, Synnve
Berk, Michael
Journal name Journal of the American academy of child & pdolescent psychiatry
Volume number 52
Issue number 10
Start page 1038
End page 1047
Total pages 10
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2013-10
ISSN 0890-8567
1527-5418
Keyword(s) anxiety
diet
depression
externalizing
internalizing
Summary Objective
Diet quality is related to the risk for depression and anxiety in adults and adolescents; however, the possible impact of maternal and early postnatal nutritional exposures on children’s subsequent mental health is unexplored.

Method
The large prospective Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study recruited pregnant women between 1999 and 2008. Data were collected from mothers during pregnancy and when children were 6 months and 1.5, 3, and 5 years of age. Latent growth curve models were used to model linear development in children’s internalizing and externalizing problems from 1.5 to 5 years of age as a function of diet quality during pregnancy and at 1.5 and 3 years. Diet quality was evaluated by dietary pattern extraction and characterized as “healthy” or “unhealthy.” The sample comprised 23,020 eligible women and their children. Adjustments were made for variables including sex of the child, maternal depression, maternal and paternal age, maternal educational attainment, household income, maternal smoking before and during pregnancy, mothers’ parental locus of control, and marital status.

Results
Higher intakes of unhealthy foods during pregnancy predicted externalizing problems among children, independently of other potential confounding factors and childhood diet. Children with a high level of unhealthy diet postnatally had higher levels of both internalizing and externalizing problems. Moreover, children with a low level of postnatal healthy diet also had higher levels of both internalizing and externalizing problems.

Conclusion
Among this large cohort of mothers and children, early nutritional exposures were independently related to the risk for behavioral and emotional problems in children.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30059479

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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