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Formation of cortical plasticity in older adults following tDCS and motor training

Goodwill, Alicia M., Reynolds, John, Daly, Robin M. and Kidgell, Dawson J. 2013, Formation of cortical plasticity in older adults following tDCS and motor training, Frontiers in aging neuroscience, vol. 5, no. Article 87, pp. 1-9.

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Title Formation of cortical plasticity in older adults following tDCS and motor training
Author(s) Goodwill, Alicia M.
Reynolds, John
Daly, Robin M.
Kidgell, Dawson J.
Journal name Frontiers in aging neuroscience
Volume number 5
Issue number Article 87
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher Frontiers Research Foundation
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2013-12
ISSN 1663-4365
Keyword(s) motor performance
older adults
corticospinal excitability
inhibition
M1 plasticity
tDCS
motor training
Summary Neurodegeneration accompanies the process of natural aging, reducing the ability to perform functional daily activities. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) alters neuronal excitability and motor performance; however its beneficial effect on the induction of primary motor cortex (M1) plasticity in older adults is unclear. Moreover, little is known as to whether the tDCS electrode arrangement differentially affects M1 plasticity and motor performance in this population. In a double-blinded, cross-over trial, we compared unilateral, bilateral and sham tDCS combined with visuomotor tracking, on M1 plasticity and motor performance of the non-dominant upper limb, immediately post and 30 min following stimulation. We found (a) unilateral and bilateral tDCS decreased tracking error by 12–22% at both time points; with sham decreasing tracking error by 10% at 30 min only, (b) at both time points, motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were facilitated (38–54%) and short-interval intracortical inhibition was released (21–36%) for unilateral and bilateral conditions relative to sham, (c) there were no differences between unilateral and bilateral conditions for any measure. These findings suggest that tDCS modulated elements of M1 plasticity, which improved motor performance irrespective of the electrode arrangement. The results provide preliminary evidence indicating that tDCS is a safe non-invasive tool to preserve or improve neurological function and motor control in older adults.
Language eng
Field of Research 110903 Central Nervous System
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Frontiers Research Foundation
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30059480

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.