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Do we need both cognitive and behavioural components in interventions for depressed mood in people with mild intellectual disability?

McGillivray, J. A. and Kershaw, M. 2015, Do we need both cognitive and behavioural components in interventions for depressed mood in people with mild intellectual disability?, Journal of intellectual disability research, vol. 59, no. 2, pp. 105-115, doi: 10.1111/jir.12110.

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Title Do we need both cognitive and behavioural components in interventions for depressed mood in people with mild intellectual disability?
Author(s) McGillivray, J. A.ORCID iD for McGillivray, J. A. orcid.org/0000-0003-2000-6488
Kershaw, M.
Journal name Journal of intellectual disability research
Volume number 59
Issue number 2
Start page 105
End page 115
Total pages 11
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Place of publication Chichester, England
Publication date 2015-02
ISSN 0964-2633
1365-2788
Summary  Background: A growing literature suggests that people with mild intellectual disability (ID) who have depressed mood may benefit from cognitive-behavioural interventions. There has been some speculation regarding the relative merit of the components of this approach. The aim of this study was to compare (i) cognitive strategies; (ii) behavioural strategies; and (iii) combined cognitive-behavioural (CB) strategies on depressed mood among a sample of 70 individuals with mild ID. Methods: Staff from three participating agencies received training in how to screen individuals with mild ID for depressive symptoms and risk factors for depression. Depressive symptoms and negative automatic thoughts were assessed prior to and at the conclusion of the intervention, and at 6-month follow-up. The interventions were run in groups by the same therapist. Results: A post-intervention reduction in depression scores was evident in participants of all three interventions, with no significant difference between groups. A significant reduction in negative automatic thoughts post-intervention was evident in the CB combination group and was maintained at follow-up. Examination of clinical effectiveness suggests some advantage of the CB combination in terms of improvement and highlights the possible short term impact of behavioural strategies in comparison with the longer-term potential of cognitive strategies. Conclusions: The findings support the use of group cognitive-behavioural interventions for addressing symptoms of depression among people with ID. Further research is necessary to determine the effectiveness of components. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/jir.12110
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2013, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30059545

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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Created: Thu, 16 Jan 2014, 12:54:35 EST by Jane Moschetti

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