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Environmental perceptions as mediators of the relationship between the objective built environment and walking among socioeconomically disadvantaged women

Van Dyck, Delfien, Veitch, Jenny, De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse, Thornton, Lukar and Ball, Kylie 2013, Environmental perceptions as mediators of the relationship between the objective built environment and walking among socioeconomically disadvantaged women, International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, vol. 10, no. Article 108, pp. 1-9.

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Title Environmental perceptions as mediators of the relationship between the objective built environment and walking among socioeconomically disadvantaged women
Author(s) Van Dyck, Delfien
Veitch, Jenny
De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse
Thornton, Lukar
Ball, Kylie
Journal name International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Volume number 10
Issue number Article 108
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, UK
Publication date 2013
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) Physical activity
Physical environment
GIS
Adults
Summary Background
Women living in socio-economically disadvantaged neighbourhoods are at increased risk for physical inactivity and associated health outcomes and are difficult to reach through personally tailored interventions. Targeting the built environment may be an effective strategy in this population subgroup. The aim of this study was to examine the mediating role of environmental perceptions in the relationship between the objective environment and walking for transportation/recreation among women from socio-economically disadvantaged neighbourhoods.

Methods
Baseline data of the Resilience for Eating and Activity Despite Inequality (READI) study were used. In total, 4139 women (18–46 years) completed a postal survey assessing physical environmental perceptions (aesthetics, neighbourhood physical activity environment, personal safety, neighbourhood social cohesion), physical activity, and socio-demographics. Objectively-assessed data on street connectivity and density of destinations were collected using a Geographic Information System database and based on the objective z-scores, an objective destinations/connectivity score was calculated. This index was positively scored, with higher scores representing a more favourable environment. Two-level mixed models regression analyses were conducted and the MacKinnon product-of-coefficients test was used to examine the mediating effects.

Results
The destinations/connectivity score was positively associated with transport-related walking. The perceived physical activity environment mediated 6.1% of this positive association. The destinations/connectivity score was negatively associated with leisure-time walking. Negative perceptions of aesthetics, personal safety and social cohesion of the neighbourhood jointly mediated 24.1% of this negative association.

Conclusion

For women living in socio-economically disadvantaged neighbourhoods, environmental perceptions were important mediators of the relationship between the objective built environment and walking. To increase both transport-related and leisure-time walking, it is necessary to improve both objective walkability-related characteristics (street connectivity and proximity of destinations), and perceptions of personal safety, favourable aesthetics and neighbourhood social cohesion.
Language eng
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, BioMed Central
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30059580

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Created: Fri, 17 Jan 2014, 10:46:06 EST by Barb Lavelle

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.