Openly accessible

Barriers to avoiding fast-food consumption in an environment supportive of unhealthy eating

Thornton, Lukar E, Jeffery, Robert W and Crawford, David A 2013, Barriers to avoiding fast-food consumption in an environment supportive of unhealthy eating, Public Health Nutrition, vol. 16, no. 12, pp. 2105-2113.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
thornton-barrierstoavoiding-2013.pdf Published version application/pdf 320.38KB 5

Title Barriers to avoiding fast-food consumption in an environment supportive of unhealthy eating
Author(s) Thornton, Lukar E
Jeffery, Robert W
Crawford, David A
Journal name Public Health Nutrition
Volume number 16
Issue number 12
Start page 2105
End page 2113
Total pages 9
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, UK
Publication date 2013
ISSN 1368-9800
Keyword(s) Fast food
Socio-economic disadvantage
Food environment
Summary Objective
To investigate factors (ability, motivation and the environment) that act as barriers to limiting fast-food consumption in women who live in an environment that is supportive of poor eating habits.

Design
Cross-sectional study using self-reports of individual-level data and objectively measured environmental data. Multilevel logistic regression was used to assess factors associated with frequency of fast-food consumption.

Setting
Socio-economically disadvantaged areas in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia.

Subjects
Women (n 932) from thirty-two socio-economically disadvantaged neighbourhoods living within 3 km of six or more fast-food restaurants. Women were randomly sampled in 2007–2008 as part of baseline data collection for the Resilience for Eating and Activity Despite Inequality (READI) study.

Results
Consuming low amounts of fast food was less likely in women with lower perceived ability to shop for and cook healthy foods, lower frequency of family dining, lower family support for healthy eating, more women acquaintances who eat fast food regularly and who lived further from the nearest supermarket. When modelled with the other significant factors, a lower perceived shopping ability, mid levels of family support and living further from the nearest supermarket remained significant. Among those who did not perceive fruits and vegetables to be of high quality, less frequent fast-food consumption was further reduced for those with the lowest confidence in their shopping ability.

Conclusions

Interventions designed to improve women's ability and opportunities to shop for healthy foods may be of value in making those who live in high-risk environments better able to eat healthily.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Cambridge University Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30059585

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in TR Web of Science
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 12 Abstract Views, 7 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 17 Jan 2014, 11:41:41 EST by Barb Lavelle

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.