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Key influences on motivations for utility cycling (cycling for transport to and from places)

Heesch, Kristiann C. and Sahlqvist, Shannon 2013, Key influences on motivations for utility cycling (cycling for transport to and from places), Health promotion journal of Australia, vol. 24, pp. 227-233.

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Title Key influences on motivations for utility cycling (cycling for transport to and from places)
Author(s) Heesch, Kristiann C.
Sahlqvist, ShannonORCID iD for Sahlqvist, Shannon orcid.org/0000-0002-3714-9533
Journal name Health promotion journal of Australia
Volume number 24
Start page 227
End page 233
Total pages 7
Publisher Australian Health Promotion Association
Place of publication Camperdown, NSW
Publication date 2013
ISSN 1036-1073
Keyword(s) active travel
ecological model
motivation
physical activity
Summary Issue addressed: 
Although increases in cycling in Brisbane are encouraging, bicycle mode share to work (the proportion of people travelling to work by bicycle) in the state of Queensland remains low. The aim of this qualitative study was to draw upon the lived experiences of Queensland cyclists to understand the main motivators for utility cycling (cycling as a means to get to and from places) and compare motivators between utility cyclists (those who cycle for utility as well as for recreation) and non-utility cyclists (those who cycle only for recreation).

Methods:
For an online survey, members of a bicycle group (831 utility cyclists and 931 non-utility cyclists, aged 18–90 years) were asked to describe, unprompted, what would motivate them to engage in utility cycling (more often). Responses were coded into themes within four levels of an ecological model.

Results:
Within an ecological model, built environment influences on motivation were grouped according to whether they related to appeal (safety), convenience (accessibility) or attractiveness (more amenities) and included adequate infrastructure for short trips, bikeway connectivity, end-of-trip facilities at public locations and easy and safe bicycle access to destinations outside of cities. A key social–cultural influence related to improved interactions among different road users.

Conclusions:
The built and social–cultural environments need to be more supportive of utility cycling before even current utility and non-utility cyclists will be motivated to engage (more often) in utility cycling.

So what?
Additional government strategies and more and better infrastructure that support utility cycling beyond commuter cycling may encourage a utility cycling culture.
Language eng
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Australian Health Promotion Association
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30059595

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Created: Fri, 17 Jan 2014, 13:22:51 EST by Barb Lavelle

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.