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Educational inequalities in TV viewing among older adults: a mediation analysis of ecological factors

De Cocker, Katrien, De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse, Teychenne, Megan, McNaughton, Sarah and Salmon, Jo 2013, Educational inequalities in TV viewing among older adults: a mediation analysis of ecological factors, International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, vol. 10, no. Article 138, pp. 1-10.

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Title Educational inequalities in TV viewing among older adults: a mediation analysis of ecological factors
Author(s) De Cocker, Katrien
De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse
Teychenne, Megan
McNaughton, Sarah
Salmon, Jo
Journal name International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Volume number 10
Issue number Article 138
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, UK
Publication date 2013
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) Older Adults
Cohort study
Sitting
Education
Summary Background
Television (TV) viewing, a prevalent leisure-time sedentary behaviour independently related to negative health outcomes, appears to be higher in less educated and older adults. In order to tackle the social inequalities, evidence is needed about the underlying mechanisms of the association between education and TV viewing. The present purpose was to examine the potential mediating role of personal, social and physical environmental factors in the relationship between education and TV viewing among Australian 55–65 year-old adults.

Methods

In 2010, self-reported data was collected among 4082 adults (47.6% men) across urban and rural areas of Victoria, for the Wellbeing, Eating and Exercise for a Long Life (WELL) study. The mediating role of personal (body mass index [BMI], quality of life), social (social support from family and friends, social participation at proximal level, and interpersonal trust, social cohesion, personal safety at distal level) and physical environmental (neighbourhood aesthetics, neighbourhood physical activity environment, number of televisions) factors in the association between education and TV viewing time was examined using the product-of-coefficients test of MacKinnon based on multilevel linear regression analyses (conducted in 2012).

Results
Multiple mediating analyses showed that BMI (p ≤ 0.01), personal safety (p < 0.001), neighbourhood aesthetics (p ≤ 0.01) and number of televisions (p ≤ 0.01) partly explained the educational inequalities in older adult’s TV viewing. No proximal social factors mediated the education-TV viewing association.

Conclusions

Interventions aimed to reduce TV viewing should focus on personal (BMI) and environmental (personal safety, neighbourhood aesthetics, number of televisions) factors, in order to overcome educational inequalities in sedentary behaviour among older adults.
Language eng
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, BioMed Central
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30059599

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.