The influence of organisational commitment, job involvement and utility perceptions on trainees’ motivation to improve work through learning

von Treuer, Kathryn, McHardy, Katherine and Earl, Celisha 2013, The influence of organisational commitment, job involvement and utility perceptions on trainees’ motivation to improve work through learning, Journal of vocational education and training, vol. 65, no. 4, pp. 606-620, doi: 10.1080/13636820.2013.855650.

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Title The influence of organisational commitment, job involvement and utility perceptions on trainees’ motivation to improve work through learning
Author(s) von Treuer, Kathryn
McHardy, Katherine
Earl, Celisha
Journal name Journal of vocational education and training
Volume number 65
Issue number 4
Start page 606
End page 620
Total pages 17
Publisher Routledge
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2013
ISSN 1363-6820
1747-5090
Keyword(s) Learning theory
Education and training assessment
Organisations
Vocational education and training
Workplace learning
Summary Workplace training is a key strategy often used by organisations to optimise performance. Further, trainee motivation is a key determinant of the degree to which the material learned in a training programme will be transferred to the workplace, enhancing the performance of the trainee. This study investigates the relationship between several components of the Revised Human Resource Development (HRD) Evaluation and Research Model. This model provides a framework for diagnosing and understanding the causal influences of HRD intervention outcomes on training effectiveness. Data were obtained from an online questionnaire completed by 105 employees of various organisations. Findings revealed that affective organisational commitment, job involvement and utility perceptions are predictors of motivation to learn and transfer learning. An interaction effect was found, with increased affective organisational commitment predicting greater motivation to learn when training was of lower perceived utility. These findings suggest that the design and delivery of training should emphasise the relevance and utility of the programme in order to encourage greater trainee motivation and maximise return on investment. Additionally, implementing strategies aimed at promoting organisational commitment would appear beneficial.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/13636820.2013.855650
Field of Research 170107 Industrial and Organisational Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920505 Occupational Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30059953

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
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