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The potential link between gut microbiota and IgE-mediated food allergy in early life

Molloy, John, Allen, Katrina, Collier, Fiona, Tang, Mimi L.K., Ward, Alister and Vuillermin, Peter 2013, The potential link between gut microbiota and IgE-mediated food allergy in early life, International journal of environmental research and public health, vol. 10, no. 12, pp. 7235-7256.

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Title The potential link between gut microbiota and IgE-mediated food allergy in early life
Author(s) Molloy, John
Allen, Katrina
Collier, Fiona
Tang, Mimi L.K.
Ward, Alister
Vuillermin, Peter
Journal name International journal of environmental research and public health
Volume number 10
Issue number 12
Start page 7235
End page 7256
Total pages 22
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2013
ISSN 1660-4601
1661-7827
Keyword(s) Gut microbiota
Food allergy
Immune development
Summary There has been a dramatic rise in the prevalence of IgE-mediated food allergy over recent decades, particularly among infants and young children. The cause of this increase is unknown but one putative factor is a change in the composition, richness and balance of the microbiota that colonize the human gut during early infancy. The coevolution of the human gastrointestinal tract and commensal microbiota has resulted in a symbiotic relationship in which gut microbiota play a vital role in early life immune development and function, as well as maintenance of gut wall epithelial integrity. Since IgE mediated food allergy is associated with immune dysregulation and impaired gut epithelial integrity there is substantial interest in the potential link between gut microbiota and food allergy. Although the exact link between gut microbiota and food allergy is yet to be established in humans, recent experimental evidence suggests that specific patterns of gut microbiota colonization may influence the risk and manifestations of food allergy. An understanding of the relationship between gut microbiota and food allergy has the potential to inform both the prevention and treatment of food allergy. In this paper we review the theory and evidence linking gut microbiota and IgE-mediated food allergy in early life. We then consider the implications and challenges for future research, including the techniques of measuring and analyzing gut microbiota, and the types of studies required to advance knowledge in the field.
Language eng
Field of Research 110799 Immunology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920108 Immune System and Allergy
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, MDPI AG
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30059958

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.