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SOCS proteins in development and disease

Trengove, Monique C. and Ward, Alister C. 2013, SOCS proteins in development and disease, American journal of clinical and experimental immunology, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 1-29.

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Title SOCS proteins in development and disease
Author(s) Trengove, Monique C.
Ward, Alister C.
Journal name American journal of clinical and experimental immunology
Volume number 2
Issue number 1
Start page 1
End page 29
Total pages 29
Publisher E-Century Publishing Corporation
Place of publication Madison, Wi.
Publication date 2013
ISSN 2164-7712
Keyword(s) SOCS
Development
Immunity
Disease
JAK-STAT
Cytokine
Growth factor
Signalling
Receptor tyrosine kinase
Summary Cytokine and growth factor signaling mediates essential roles in the differentiation, proliferation, survival and function of a number of cell lineages. This is achieved via specific receptors located on the surface of target cells, with ligand binding activating key intracellular signal transduction cascades to mediate the requisite cellular outcome. Effective resolution of receptor signaling is also essential, with excessive signaling having the potential for pathological consequences. The Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family of proteins represent one important mechanism to extinguish cytokine and growth factor receptor signaling. There are 8 SOCS proteins in mammals; SOCS1-7 and the alternatively named Cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein (CISH). SOCS1-3 and CISH are predominantly associated with the regulation of cytokine receptor signaling, while SOCS4-7 are more commonly involved in the control of Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling. Individual SOCS proteins are typically induced by specific cytokines and growth factors, thereby generating a negative feedback loop. As a consequence of their regulatory properties, SOCS proteins have important functions in development and homeostasis, with increasing recognition of their role in disease, particularly their tumor suppressor and anti-inflammatory functions. This review provides a synthesis of our current understanding of the SOCS family, with an emphasis on their immune and hematopoietic roles.
Language eng
Field of Research 110799 Immunology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, E-Century Publishing Corporation
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30059965

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.