Having the courage to measure up for education

Webster, R. Scott 2013, Having the courage to measure up for education, in PESA 2013 : Measuring Up in Education : Proceedings of the 43rd Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia Annual Conference 2013, Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 241-247.

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Title Having the courage to measure up for education
Author(s) Webster, R. Scott
Conference name Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia annual conference (43rd : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 6-9 Dec. 2013
Title of proceedings PESA 2013 : Measuring Up in Education : Proceedings of the 43rd Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia Annual Conference 2013
Editor(s) Webster, R. Scott
Stolz, Steven A.
Publication date 2013
Conference series Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia annual conference
Start page 241
End page 247
Total pages 7
Publisher Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Keyword(s) courage
existential
aims
religious attitude
Summary In this “age of measurement” it is increasing difficult for educators to educate (Biesta, 2010). The pressures to conform to the demands of bureaucratic authorities generally trump over educators and their aims to educate. One of the factors contributing to this is because as Dewey (1929a, p. 133) has argued, our aims and our desires to educate don’t have deep enough roots. He suggests that educators ought to have “cultivated” and “significant conscious desires” and a disposition to be “courageous” (1929a, p. 134; 1929b, p. 38) in order to attain the independence to ensure that our practices in education are indeed educational. Dewey (1934) called such a disposition a “religious attitude” because it engages with the ultimate concerns that people can aspire towards. In this paper I shall argue that this religious attitude of Dewey’s which can enable our roots to deepen, does not just pertain to our aims of education as an intellectual phenomenon. Rather it can be understood as existential (Webster, 2009) in the sense that aims of education are specific to individuals in situation – not to abstract or universal understandings of education. It shall also be argued that this existential aspect of our being is emotive, and deepening its roots might enable us to become more courageous and thus more able to challenge the barriers inherent in our current ‘age of measurement’ so that education may become more of a reality.
ISBN 9780646904191
Language eng
Field of Research 130202 Curriculum and Pedagogy Theory and Development
Socio Economic Objective 930399 Curriculum not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
HERDC collection year 2013
Copyright notice ©2013, PESA
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30060182

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Education
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