Cycling time to failure is better maintained by cold than contrast or thermoneutral lower-body water immersion in normothermia

Crampton, David, Donne, Bernard, Warmington, Stuart A and Egaña, Mikel 2013, Cycling time to failure is better maintained by cold than contrast or thermoneutral lower-body water immersion in normothermia, European Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 113, no. 12, pp. 3059-3067.

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Title Cycling time to failure is better maintained by cold than contrast or thermoneutral lower-body water immersion in normothermia
Author(s) Crampton, David
Donne, Bernard
Warmington, Stuart A
Egaña, Mikel
Journal name European Journal of Applied Physiology
Volume number 113
Issue number 12
Start page 3059
End page 3067
Total pages 9
Publisher Springer-Verlag
Place of publication Dusseldorf, Germany
Publication date 2013
ISSN 1439-6319
1439-6327
Keyword(s) Thermotherapy
Exercise recovery
Hydrotherapy
Cold water immersion
Contrast water therapy
Summary Purpose
To examine the effects of four commonly used recovery treatments applied between two bouts of intense endurance cycling on the performance of the second bout in normothermia (~21 °C).

Methods
Nine trained men completed two submaximal exhaustive cycling bouts (Ex1 and Ex2: 5 min at ~50 % V˙O2 peak, followed by 5 min at ~60 % V˙O2 peak and then ~80 % V˙O2 peak to failure) separated by 30 min of (a) cold water immersion at 15 °C (C15), (b) contrast water therapy alternating 2.5 min at 8 °C and 2.5 min at 40 °C (CT), (c) thermoneutral water immersion at 34 °C (T34) and (d) cycling at ~40 % V˙O2 peak (AR).

Results
Exercise performance, cardiovascular and metabolic responses during Ex1 were similar among all trials. However, time to failure (~80 % V˙O2 peak bout) during Ex2 was significantly (P < 0.05) longer in C15 (18.0 ± 1.6) than in CT (14.5 ± 1.5), T34 (12.4 ± 1.4) and AR (10.6 ± 1.0); and it was also longer (P < 0.05) in CT than AR. Core temperature and heart rate were significantly (P < 0.05) lower during the initial ~15 min of Ex2 during C15 compared with all other conditions but they reached similar levels at the end of Ex2.

Conclusions
A 30 min period of C15 was more beneficial in maintaining intense submaximal cycling performance than CT, T34 and AR; and CT was also more beneficial than T34 and AR. These effects were not mediated by the effect of water immersion per se, but by the continuous (C15) or intermittent (CT) temperature stimulus (cold) applied throughout the recovery.
Language eng
Field of Research 110602 Exercise Physiology
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
HERDC collection year 2013
Copyright notice ©2013, Springer
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30060264

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Created: Tue, 04 Feb 2014, 22:21:30 EST by Stuart Warmington

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