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Accounting for the association of family conflict and heavy alcohol use among adolescent girls: the role of depressed mood

Chan, Gary C. K., Kelly, Adrian B. and Toumbourou, John W. 2013, Accounting for the association of family conflict and heavy alcohol use among adolescent girls: the role of depressed mood, Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs, vol. 74, no. 3, pp. 396-405.

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Title Accounting for the association of family conflict and heavy alcohol use among adolescent girls: the role of depressed mood
Author(s) Chan, Gary C. K.
Kelly, Adrian B.
Toumbourou, John W.ORCID iD for Toumbourou, John W. orcid.org/0000-0002-8431-3762
Journal name Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs
Volume number 74
Issue number 3
Start page 396
End page 405
Total pages 10
Publisher Alcohol Research Documentation
Place of publication Piscataway, New Jersey
Publication date 2013-05
ISSN 1937-1888
1938-4114
Keyword(s) adolescents
heavy alcohol use
family conflict
adolescent girls
depression
depressed mood
drinking behaviour
Australia
family-oriented prevention programs
Summary Heavy alcohol use increases dramatically at age 14, and there is emerging cross-sectional evidence that when girls experience family conflict at younger ages (11–13 years) the risk of alcohol use and misuse is high. This study evaluated the role of family conflict and subsequent depressed mood in predicting heavy alcohol use among adolescent girls. Method: This was a three-wave longitudinal study with annual assessments (modal ages 12, 13, and 14 years). The participants (N = 886, 57% female) were from 12 metropolitan schools in Victoria, Australia, and participants completed questionnaires during school class time. The key measures were based on the Communities That Care Youth Survey and included family conflict (Wave 1), depressed mood (Wave 2), and heavy alcohol use (Wave 3). Control variables included school commitment, number of peers who consumed alcohol, whether parents were living together, and ethnic background. Results: With all controls in the model, depressed mood at Wave 2 was predicted by family conflict at Wave 1. The interaction of family conflict with gender was significant, with girls showing a stronger association of family conflict and depressed mood. Depressed mood at Wave 2 predicted heavy alcohol use at Wave 3. Conclusions: Girls may be especially vulnerable to family conflict, and subsequent depressed mood increases the risk of heavy alcohol use. The results support the need for gender-sensitive family-oriented prevention programs delivered in late childhood and early adolescence.
Language eng
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Alcohol Research Documentation
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30060337

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.