Openly accessible

Differential effects of exercise on tibial shaft marrow density in young female athletes

Rantalainen, Timo, Nikander, Riku, Heinonen, Ari, Cervinka, Tomas, Sievanen, Harri and Daly, Robin M. 2013, Differential effects of exercise on tibial shaft marrow density in young female athletes, Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism, vol. 98, no. 5, pp. 2037-2044.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
daly-differentialeffects-2013.pdf Published version application/pdf 403.93KB 13

Title Differential effects of exercise on tibial shaft marrow density in young female athletes
Author(s) Rantalainen, Timo
Nikander, Riku
Heinonen, Ari
Cervinka, Tomas
Sievanen, Harri
Daly, Robin M.
Journal name Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
Volume number 98
Issue number 5
Start page 2037
End page 2044
Total pages 8
Publisher The Endocrine Society
Place of publication Chevy Chase, Maryland
Publication date 2013-05
ISSN 0021-972X
1945-7197
Keyword(s) bone marrow adiposity
bone marrow density
mechanical loading
female athletes
tibial bone strength
osteoblastogenesis
Summary Context:
Increased mechanical loading can promote the preferential differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to osteoblastogenesis, but it is not known whether long-term bone strength-enhancing exercise in humans can reduce marrow adiposity.

Objective:
Our objective was to examine whether bone marrow density (MaD), as an estimate of marrow adiposity 1) differs between young female athletes with contrasting loading histories and bone strengths and 2) is an independent predictor of bone strength at the weight-bearing tibia.

Design:
Mid-tibial MaD, cortical area (CoA), total area, medullary area, strength strain index (SSI), and cortical volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) (total, endocortical, midcortical, and pericortical) was assessed using peripheral quantitative computed tomography in 179 female athletes involved in both impact and nonimpact loading sports and 41 controls aged 17–40 years.

Results:
As we have previously reported CoA, total area, and SSI were 16% to 24% greater in the impact group compared with the controls (all P < .001) and 12% to 18% greater than in the nonimpact group (all P < .001). The impact group also had 0.5% higher MaD than the nonimpact and control groups (both P < .05). Regression analysis further showed that midtibial MaD was significantly associated with SSI, CoA, endocortical vBMD, and pericortical vBMD (P < .05) in all women combined, after adjusting for age, bone length, loading groups, medullary area, muscle cross-sectional area, and percent fat.

Conclusion:
In young female athletes, tibial bone MaD was associated with loading history and was an independent predictor of tibial bone strength. These findings suggest that an exercise-induced increase in bone strength may be mediated via reduced bone marrow adiposity and consequently increased osteoblastogenesis.
Language eng
Field of Research 110602 Exercise Physiology
Socio Economic Objective 920116 Skeletal System and Disorders (incl. Arthritis)
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, The Endocrine Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30060423

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 7 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 56 Abstract Views, 13 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 13 Feb 2014, 12:55:36 EST by Jane Moschetti

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.