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Sociodemographic factors associated with healthy eating and food security in socio-economically disadvantaged groups in the UK and Victoria, Australia

Thornton, Lukar E, Pearce, Jamie R and Ball, Kylie 2014, Sociodemographic factors associated with healthy eating and food security in socio-economically disadvantaged groups in the UK and Victoria, Australia, Public Health Nutrition, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 20-30.

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Title Sociodemographic factors associated with healthy eating and food security in socio-economically disadvantaged groups in the UK and Victoria, Australia
Author(s) Thornton, Lukar E
Pearce, Jamie R
Ball, Kylie
Journal name Public Health Nutrition
Volume number 17
Issue number 1
Start page 20
End page 30
Total pages 11
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, UK
Publication date 2014
ISSN 1368-9800
Keyword(s) Eating behaviours
Food security
Socio-economic position
Cross-national comparison
Summary Objective
To investigate the associations between sociodemographic factors and both diet indicators and food security among socio-economically disadvantaged populations in two different (national) contextual settings.

Design
Logistic regression was used to determine cross-sectional associations between nationality, marital status, presence of children in the household, education, employment status and household income (four low income categories) with daily fruit and vegetable consumption, low-fat milk consumption and food security.

Setting
Socio-economically disadvantaged neighbourhoods in the UK and Australia.

Subjects
Two samples of low-income women from disadvantaged neighbourhoods: (i) in the UK, the 2003–05 Low Income Diet and Nutrition Survey (LIDNS; n 643); and (ii) in Australia, the 2007–08 Resilience for Eating and Activity Despite Inequality (READI; n 1340).

Results
The influence of nationality, marital status and children in the household on the dietary outcomes varied between the two nations. Obtaining greater education qualifications was the most telling factor associated with healthier dietary behaviours. Being employed was positively associated with low-fat milk consumption in both nations and with fruit consumption in the UK, while income was not associated with dietary behaviours in either nation. In Australia, the likelihood of being food secure was higher among those who were born outside Australia, married, employed or had a greater income, while higher income was the only significant factor in the UK.

Conclusions
The identification of factors that differently influence dietary behaviours and food security in socio-economically disadvantaged populations in the UK and Australia suggests continued efforts need to be made to ensure that interventions and policy responses are informed by the best available local evidence.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Restricted until 2015
Copyright notice ©2014, Cambridge University Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30060473

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.