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Combined associations of sitting time and physical activity with obesity in young adults

Cleland, Verity J., Schmidt, Michael, Salmon, Jo, Dwyer, Terrence and Venn, Alison 2014, Combined associations of sitting time and physical activity with obesity in young adults, Journal of physical activity and health, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 136-144, doi: 10.1123/jpah.2011-0143.

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Title Combined associations of sitting time and physical activity with obesity in young adults
Author(s) Cleland, Verity J.
Schmidt, Michael
Salmon, JoORCID iD for Salmon, Jo orcid.org/0000-0002-4734-6354
Dwyer, Terrence
Venn, Alison
Journal name Journal of physical activity and health
Volume number 11
Issue number 1
Start page 136
End page 144
Total pages 9
Publisher Human Kinetics
Place of publication Champaign, Illinois
Publication date 2014-01
ISSN 1543-3080
1543-5474
Keyword(s) pedometers
sitting
cross-sectional
weight
objective measures
Summary Background:
We investigated associations of total sedentary behavior (SB) and objectively-measured and self-reported physical activity (PA) with obesity.

Methods:
Data from 1662 adults (26–36 years) included daily steps, self-reported PA, sitting, and waist circumference. SB and PA were dichotomized at the median, then 2 variables created (SB/self-reported PA; SB/objectively-measured PA) each with 4 categories: low SB/high PA (reference group), high SB/high PA, low SB/low PA, high SB/low PA.

Results:
Overall, high SB/low PA was associated with 95 –168% increased obesity odds. Associations were stronger and more consistent for steps than self-reported PA for men (OR 2.68, 95% CI 1.36–5.32 and OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.01–3.79, respectively) and women (OR 2.66, 95% CI 1.58–4.49 and OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.21–3.31, respectively). Among men, obesity was higher when daily steps were low, irrespective of sitting (low SB/low steps OR 2.07, 95% CI 1.03– 4.17; high SB/low steps OR 2.68, 95% CI 1.36–5.32).

Conclusions:
High sitting and low activity increased obesity odds among adults. Irrespective of sitting, men with low step counts had increased odds of obesity. The findings highlight the importance of engaging in physical activity and limiting sitting.
Language eng
DOI 10.1123/jpah.2011-0143
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, Human Kinetics
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30060474

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research
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Created: Mon, 17 Feb 2014, 14:12:21 EST by Penny Andrews

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