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‘Waiting-to-see’ if the baby will come : findings from a qualitative study in Kafa Zone, Ethiopia

Jackson, Ruth 2013, ‘Waiting-to-see’ if the baby will come : findings from a qualitative study in Kafa Zone, Ethiopia, Ethiopian journal of health development, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 118-123.

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Title ‘Waiting-to-see’ if the baby will come : findings from a qualitative study in Kafa Zone, Ethiopia
Author(s) Jackson, Ruth
Journal name Ethiopian journal of health development
Volume number 27
Issue number 2
Start page 118
End page 123
Total pages 6
Publisher Ethiopian Public Health Association
Place of publication Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Publication date 2013
ISSN 1021-6790
Keyword(s) maternal health
prolonged labor
qualitative research
Ethiopia
Summary Background: Much of the quantitative research on maternal mortality in developing countries focuses on the need for health service interventions such as skilled attendants at birth and emergency obstetric and newborn care. A growing number of studies document the need for a more comprehensive perspective and include the macrostructural, that is, the social, cultural, economic and political determinants of health.
Objectives: To examine the salient aspects of birth at home and variables that influence decision making around transfer to a health facility during prolonged/obstructed labor.
Methods: Ethnography using participant observation and semi-structured interviews was conducted in 2007. A total of 56 mothers in Kafa Zone were selected: 20 in-depth interviews with women who gave birth at home; four who gave birth in a health facility; and 32 during antenatal care. Interviews were also conducted with health staff from Bonga Hospital and 15 health centers or health posts. Analysis followed a process of data reduction, data display and conclusion drawing/verification with the data organized around key themes.
Results: Most women gave birth at home assisted by their neighbor, mother, mother-in-law, or husband. It is likely women who gave birth at home feel ‘safe’ because that is where birth normally takes place and where they feel supported by close relatives and neighbors. Prolonged labor or ‘waiting-to-see’ if the baby would come was somewhat normalized and resulted in considerable delays to seeking assistance. Women felt it was ‘unsafe’ to go to a health facility because of the very real possibility that they would die on the way.
Conclusion: The findings highlight the importance of educating the local communities to recognize pregnancy related risks and to develop and implement appropriate responses, especially early referral, as communities play an important mobilizing role to health services.
Language eng
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
160305 Population Trends and Policies
160101 Anthropology of Development
Socio Economic Objective 920507 Women's Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Ethiopian Public Health Association
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30060704

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Alfred Deakin Research Institute
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Created: Thu, 20 Feb 2014, 00:47:52 EST by Ruth Jackson

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.