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Reinventing D'Jillong : current regeneration initiatives challenging the identity and place of Geelong

Jones, David and Meikle, Helen 2013, Reinventing D'Jillong : current regeneration initiatives challenging the identity and place of Geelong, in SOAC 2013 : Proceedings of the 2013 6th State of Australian Cities Conference, SOAC, [Sydney, N.S.W.], pp. 1-14.

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Title Reinventing D'Jillong : current regeneration initiatives challenging the identity and place of Geelong
Author(s) Jones, David
Meikle, Helen
Conference name State of Australian Cities. Conference (6th : 2013 : Sydney, NSW)
Conference location Sydney, NSW
Conference dates 26-29 Nov. 2013
Title of proceedings SOAC 2013 : Proceedings of the 2013 6th State of Australian Cities Conference
Editor(s) Ruming, Kristian
Randolph, Bill
Gurran, Nicole
Publication date 2013
Conference series State of Australian Cities Conference
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher SOAC
Place of publication [Sydney, N.S.W.]
Summary Australian regional city regeneration in Australia is increasingly becoming an important topic as they attempt to position themselves mid-way between larger discourses about capital cities and peri-urban landscapes. Historically these cities, like Newcastle, Wollongong and Geelong, have been marginalised in infrastructure and planning support systems, yet subject to erratic Commonwealth and State funded initiatives that have divested major specific-purpose complexes into their cities. Such has been as a consequence of of 'decentralisation' and 'regionalisation' political platforms, but also to address employment and voting needs. As an example, Geelong embraced contemporary industrialism, particularly automotive, and built on its port and wool export capacities. Politics, intransigence and lack of economic investment compounded the failure to create quality urban fabric and enable innovative planning. With this legacy, this regional city finds itself at the cusp of heavy industry disintegration, education and health sectorial growth, population increases aided by regional escapism, and a lethargic city centre. In attempting to redress these trends, Geelong is consciously attempting to re-image itself, regenerate key sections of its urban fabric, but also manage the regional escapism (sea change / tree change) phenomena. This paper critiques the larger context, and then uses three examples - "Vision 2" in the city centre, the Mega Port proposal, Fyansford Green and the Moolap salt marsh - as foils to reflect whether these initiatives are and can assist the facilitation of city structural change, economic renewal and enhanced urban design and place-making outcomes.
ISBN 1740440331
Language eng
Field of Research 120504 Land Use and Environmental Planning
120508 Urban Design
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
HERDC collection year 2013
Copyright notice ©2013, SOAC
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30060754

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.