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Pedagogy of oppressed community engagement : socially inclusive visioning of urban change

Meikle, Helen and Jones, David 2013, Pedagogy of oppressed community engagement : socially inclusive visioning of urban change, in SOAC 2013 : Proceedings of the State of Australian Cities 2013 Conference, SOAC, [Sydney, N.S.W.], pp. 1-13.

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Title Pedagogy of oppressed community engagement : socially inclusive visioning of urban change
Author(s) Meikle, Helen
Jones, David
Conference name State of Australian Cities. Conference (6th : 2013 : Sydney, N. S. W.)
Conference location Sydney, N. S. W.
Conference dates 26 - 29 Nov. 2013
Title of proceedings SOAC 2013 : Proceedings of the State of Australian Cities 2013 Conference
Editor(s) Ruming, Kristian
Randolph, Bill
Gurran, Nicole
Publication date 2013
Conference series State of Australian Cities Conference
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher SOAC
Place of publication [Sydney, N.S.W.]
Summary It is generally accepted that good practice in policy making and urban change initiatives requires community engagement, where community-based approaches are emphasised as a means of socially inclusive visioning. Communities expect greater transparency, accountability and engagement. This expectation is not always met, with many studies focusing on the perceived tickbox effect - where engagement is a process that has to be undertaken rather than being welcomed and embraced as an integral part of planning for urban change. This paper explores multi-disciplinary concepts and looks at ways these can be linked to community engagement in planning, particularly in larger urban Councils. In this brief glimpse at the wide variety of disciplines that could be drawn on, the paper uses information systems, teaching models, organisational theory and public policy to highlight the potential for altering concepts of community engagement. It concludes that, from these particular examples: the use of double-loop learning could help to empower the community (from organisational theory), collaboration and participation necessitate the co-ordination and exchange of information and knowledge within and between organisations (information systems), the preconception that the authority holds all the knowledge ready to be handed out to the community (teaching models) needs to be challenged, and partnerships are important in empowering people (public policy).
ISBN 1740440331
Language eng
Field of Research 120501 Community Planning
120507 Urban Analysis and Development
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2013, SOAC
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30060767

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.