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Buses, cars, bicycles and walkers the influence of the type of human transport on the flight responses of waterbirds

McLeod, Emily M., Guay, Patrick-Jean, Taysom, Alice J., Robinson, Randall W. and Weston, Michael A. 2013, Buses, cars, bicycles and walkers the influence of the type of human transport on the flight responses of waterbirds, PLoS ONE, vol. 8, no. 12, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0082008.

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Title Buses, cars, bicycles and walkers the influence of the type of human transport on the flight responses of waterbirds
Author(s) McLeod, Emily M.
Guay, Patrick-Jean
Taysom, Alice J.
Robinson, Randall W.
Weston, Michael A.ORCID iD for Weston, Michael A. orcid.org/0000-0002-8717-0410
Journal name PLoS ONE
Volume number 8
Issue number 12
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2013-12-18
ISSN 1932-6203
Summary One way to manage disturbance to waterbirds in natural areas where humans require access is to promote the occurrence of stimuli for which birds tolerate closer approaches, and so cause fewer responses. We conducted 730 experimental approaches to 39 species of waterbird, using five stimulus types (single walker, three walkers, bicycle, car and bus) selected to mimic different human management options available for a controlled access, Ramsar-listed wetland. Across species, where differences existed (56% of 25 cases), motor vehicles always evoked shorter flight-initiation distances (FID) than humans on foot. The influence of stimulus type on FID varied across four species for which enough data were available for complete cross-stimulus analysis. All four varied FID in relation to stimuli, differing in 4 to 7 of 10 possible comparisons. Where differences occurred, the effect size was generally modest, suggesting that managing stimulus type (e.g. by requiring people to use vehicles) may have species-specific, modest benefits, at least for the waterbirds we studied. However, different stimulus types have different capacities to reduce the frequency of disturbance (i.e. by carrying more people) and vary in their capacity to travel around important habitat
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0082008
Field of Research 050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
Socio Economic Objective 960503 Ecosystem Assessment and Management of Coastal and Estuarine Environments
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Public Library of Science
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30060852

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.