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Temporal allocation of foraging effort in female Australian fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus)

Hoskins, Andrew J. and Arnould, John P.Y. 2013, Temporal allocation of foraging effort in female Australian fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus), PLoS ONE, vol. 8, no. 11, pp. 1-14.

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Title Temporal allocation of foraging effort in female Australian fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus)
Author(s) Hoskins, Andrew J.
Arnould, John P.Y.
Journal name PLoS ONE
Volume number 8
Issue number 11
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2013-11-14
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) foraging
fur seals
behavioural changes
Summary Across an individual's life, foraging decisions will be affected by multiple intrinsic and extrinsic drivers that act at differing timescales. This study aimed to assess how female Australian fur seals allocated foraging effort and the behavioural changes used to achieve this at three temporal scales: within a day, across a foraging trip and across the final six months of the lactation period. Foraging effort peaked during daylight hours (57% of time diving) with lulls in activity just prior to and after daylight. Dive duration reduced across the day (196 s to 168 s) but this was compensated for by an increase in the vertical travel rate (1500–1600 m•h−1) and a reduction in postdive duration (111–90 s). This suggests physiological constraints (digestive costs) or prey availability may be limiting mean dive durations as a day progresses. During short trips (<2.9 d), effort remained steady at 55% of time diving, whereas, on long trips (>2.9 d) effort increased up to 2–3 d and then decreased. Dive duration decreased at the same rate in short and long trips, respectively, before stabilising (long trips) between 4–5 d. Suggesting that the same processes (digestive costs or prey availability) working at the daily scale may also be present across a trip. Across the lactation period, foraging effort, dive duration and vertical travel rate increased until August, before beginning to decrease. This suggests that as the nutritional demands of the suckling pup and developing foetus increase, female effort increases to accommodate this, providing insight into the potential constraints of maternal investment in this species
Language eng
Field of Research 060809 Vertebrate Biology
060201 Behavioural Ecology
060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl Marine Ichthyology)
Socio Economic Objective 960507 Ecosystem Assessment and Management of Marine Environments
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Public Library of Science
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30060856

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.