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Time, philosophy and chronopathologies

Reynolds, Jack 2012, Time, philosophy and chronopathologies, Parrhesia: A Journal of Critical Philosophy, no. 15, pp. 64-80.

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Title Time, philosophy and chronopathologies
Author(s) Reynolds, JackORCID iD for Reynolds, Jack orcid.org/0000-0002-4725-0395
Journal name Parrhesia: A Journal of Critical Philosophy
Issue number 15
Start page 64
End page 80
Total pages 17
Publisher Open Humanities Press
Place of publication London, UK
Publication date 2012
ISSN 1834-3287
Summary This essay is an elaboration on some central themes and arguments from my recent book, Chronopathologies: Time and Politics in Deleuze, Derrida, Phenomenology and Analytic Philosophy (Rowman and Littlefield 2012). There is hence an element of generality to this essay that the book itself is better able to justify. But a short programmatic piece has its own virtues, especially for those of us who are time poor (which is pretty much everyone in contemporary academia). Moreover, it adds a dimension to the above book by more explicitly situating it in relation to what is an emerging view in some recent scholarship (such as John McCumber, Len Lawlor, David Hoy, and before this Liz Grosz) that time is central to the identity of continental philosophy, as well as considering some of the work that in different ways contests this kind of interpretation of the identity of continental philosophy (e.g. Simon Glendinning, and, tacitly, Paul Redding). In continuing to side with the former over the latter, I will also develop my argument that time is one of the most significant factors in the divided house that I think ontemporary philosophy remains, and I conclude by offering a series of negative prescriptions regarding how we might better avoid particular chronopathologies, or time-sicknesses, that are endemic to these philosophical trajectories, and that are also present (to greater and lesser degrees) in the majority of individual philosophers standardly labeled analytic and continental. To the extent that such sicknesses are at least partly inevitable, akin to a transcendental illusion, this paper consists in a call to be more attentive to this tendency, and to the methodological, metaphilosophical, and ethico-political consequences that follow from them.
Language eng
Field of Research 220399 Philosophy not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970122 Expanding Knowledge in Philosophy and Religious Studies
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Open Humanities Press
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30061040

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Communication and Creative Arts
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.