Community-onset Staphylococcus aureus infections presenting to general practices in South-eastern Australia

Bennett, CM, Coombs, GW, Wood, GM, Howden, BP, Johnson, LEA, White, D and Johnson, PDR 2013, Community-onset Staphylococcus aureus infections presenting to general practices in South-eastern Australia, Epidemiology and infection, vol. 142, no. 3, pp. 501-511, doi: 10.1017/S0950268813001581.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Community-onset Staphylococcus aureus infections presenting to general practices in South-eastern Australia
Author(s) Bennett, CMORCID iD for Bennett, CM orcid.org/0000-0001-9581-1612
Coombs, GW
Wood, GM
Howden, BP
Johnson, LEA
White, D
Johnson, PDR
Journal name Epidemiology and infection
Volume number 142
Issue number 3
Start page 501
End page 511
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2013-07-18
ISSN 0950-2688
1469-4409
Keyword(s) epidermiology
methicillin-resistant
public health emerging infections
staphylococcal infections
Staphylococcus aureus
Summary Community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus infections are a public health concern, yet little is known about infections that do not present to hospital. We identified community-onset S. aureus infections via specimens submitted to a community-based pathology service. Referring doctors confirmed eligibility and described infection site, severity and treatment. Isolates were characterized on antibiotic resistance, PFGE, MLST/SCCmec, and Panton–Valentine leukocidin (PVL), representing 106 community-onset infections; 34 non-multiresistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus (nmMRSA) (resistant to <3 non-β-lactam antibiotics), 15 multiply antibiotic-resistant MRSA (mMRSA) and 57 methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA). Most (93%) were skin and soft tissue infections. PVL genes were carried by 42% of nmMRSA isolates [95% confidence interval (CI) 26–61] and 15% of MSSA (95% CI 8–28). PVL was associated with infections of the trunk, head or neck (56·4% vs. 24·3%, P= 0·005) in younger patients (23 vs. 52 years, P< 0·001), and with boils or abscesses (OR 8·67, 95% CI 2·9–26·2), suggesting underlying differences in exposure and/or pathogenesis.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S0950268813001581
Field of Research 111706 Epidemiology
110309 Infectious Diseases
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920109 Infectious Diseases
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30061201

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Health and Social Development
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 10 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 10 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 476 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 05 Mar 2014, 14:10:24 EST by Catherine Bennett

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.