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Mental context reinstatement or drawing: which better enhances children's recall of witnessed events and protects against suggestive questions?

Gentle, Mia, Powell, Martine B and Sharman, Stefanie J 2013, Mental context reinstatement or drawing: which better enhances children's recall of witnessed events and protects against suggestive questions?, Australian Journal of Psychology, vol. Early View, doi: 10.1111/ajpy.12040.

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Title Mental context reinstatement or drawing: which better enhances children's recall of witnessed events and protects against suggestive questions?
Author(s) Gentle, Mia
Powell, Martine BORCID iD for Powell, Martine B orcid.org/0000-0001-5092-1308
Sharman, Stefanie JORCID iD for Sharman, Stefanie J orcid.org/0000-0002-0635-047X
Journal name Australian Journal of Psychology
Volume number Early View
Total pages 10
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Place of publication Richmond, Vic.
Publication date 2013
ISSN 0004-9530
Keyword(s) Child witnesses
Event recall
Drawing
Mental context reinstatement
Summary The aim of this experiment was to examine the effectiveness of two techniques in enhancing children's recall of an event that they experienced approximately a week earlier. Younger (5–6 years) and older (8–9 years) children were interviewed about a magic show event in one of three conditions. Before recalling the event, some children were instructed to mentally reinstate the context of the event (MCR group), others were asked to draw the context of the event (DCR group), and others received no reinstatement instructions (NCR). Results showed that these instructions had no impact on children's free recall or responses to open-ended prompts. However, reinstatement instructions impacted children's responses to suggestive questions: those in the DCR group gave more accurate responses than those in the NCR group. These findings provide preliminary support for the use of drawing as a potentially protective exercise that lessens the impact of biased questions with child witnesses.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/ajpy.12040
Field of Research 170104 Forensic Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30061226

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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Created: Thu, 06 Mar 2014, 10:09:16 EST by Jane Moschetti

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