Socio-demographic and work setting correlates of poor mental health in a population sample of working Victorians: application in evidence-based intervention priority setting

LaMontagne, AD, D’Souza, RM and Shann, CB 2012, Socio-demographic and work setting correlates of poor mental health in a population sample of working Victorians: application in evidence-based intervention priority setting, International journal of mental health promotion, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 109-122, doi: 10.1080/14623730.2012.703048.

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Title Socio-demographic and work setting correlates of poor mental health in a population sample of working Victorians: application in evidence-based intervention priority setting
Author(s) LaMontagne, ADORCID iD for LaMontagne, AD orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
D’Souza, RM
Shann, CB
Journal name International journal of mental health promotion
Volume number 14
Issue number 2
Start page 109
End page 122
Total pages 14
Publisher Routledge
Place of publication Oxford, UK
Publication date 2012
ISSN 1462-3730
2049-8543
Keyword(s) Mental health
Mental health promotion
Mental disorders
Mental illness
Work
Workplace
Summary Interventions to promote mental health in the workplace are rapidly gaining acceptability as a means to prevent, screen, treat and effectively manage the growing disease burden of depression and anxiety among working people. The objective of this study was to identify socio-demographic and work setting correlates of poor mental health to consider alongside other evidence in priority setting for workplace mental health promotion (MHP). Multiple logistic regression was used to model the probability of poor mental health (SF-12) in relation to socio-demographic (gender, age, education, marital status and occupational skill level) and employment factors (workplace size and type, industrial sector, employment arrangement and working hours) in a population-based cross-sectional survey of 1051 working Victorians. As a result, poor mental health was (21% prevalence overall) higher in working females than in males and decreased with increasing age. Only one employment factor was significant in demographically adjusted multivariate analyses, showing an increase in the odds of poor mental health with increasing working hours. It is concluded that based on the prevalence of poor mental health, Victorian work settings with high proportions of younger workers, and younger working women in particular, should be prioritized for workplace MHP. Thus, together with other research demonstrating particularly poor psychosocial working conditions for young working women, sectors with an over-representation of this group (e.g. service sector) could be prioritized for workplace MHP alongside young and blue-collar males (also a priority due to low mental healthcare service use).
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/14623730.2012.703048
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30061281

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Health and Social Development
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