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Workplace bullying a risk for permanent employees

Keuskamp, Dominic, Ziersch, Anna M, Baum, Fran E and LaMontagne, Anthony D 2012, Workplace bullying a risk for permanent employees, Australian and New Zealand journal of public health, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 116-119, doi: 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2011.00780.x.

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Title Workplace bullying a risk for permanent employees
Author(s) Keuskamp, Dominic
Ziersch, Anna M
Baum, Fran E
LaMontagne, Anthony DORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony D orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Journal name Australian and New Zealand journal of public health
Volume number 36
Issue number 2
Start page 116
End page 119
Total pages 4
Publisher Public Health Association of Australia Inc
Place of publication Deakin, ACT
Publication date 2012
ISSN 1326-0200
Keyword(s) Workplace bullying
Casual employment
Permanent employment
Psycho-social work environment
Summary Objective: We tested the hypothesis that the risk of experiencing workplace bullying was greater for those employed on casual contracts compared to permanent or ongoing employees. Methods: A cross-sectional population-based telephone survey was conducted in South Australia in 2009. Employment arrangements were classified by self-report into four categories: permanent, casual, fixed-term and self-employed. Self-report of workplace bullying was modelled using multiple logistic regression in relation to employment arrangement, controlling for sex, age, working hours, years in job, occupational skill level, marital status and a proxy for socioeconomic status. Results: Workplace bullying was reported by 174 respondents (15.2%). Risk of workplace bullying was higher for being in a professional occupation, having a university education and being separated, divorced or widowed, but did not vary significantly by sex, age or job tenure. In adjusted multivariate logistic regression models, casual workers were significantly less likely than workers on permanent or fixed-term contracts to report bullying. Those separated, divorced or widowed had higher odds of reporting bullying than married, de facto or never-married workers. Conclusions: Contrary to expectation, workplace bullying was more often reported by permanent than casual employees. It may represent an exposure pathway not previously linked with the more idealised permanent employment arrangement. Implications: A finer understanding of psycho-social hazards across all employment arrangements is needed, with equal attention to the hazards associated with permanent as well as casual employment.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2011.00780.x
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Public Health Association of Australia
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30061282

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.