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Occupational light vehicle use: characterising the at-risk population

Stuckey, Rwth, LaMontagne, Anthony D, Glass, Deborah C and Sim, Malcolm R 2010, Occupational light vehicle use: characterising the at-risk population, Journal of health & safety research & practice, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 17-28.

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Title Occupational light vehicle use: characterising the at-risk population
Author(s) Stuckey, Rwth
LaMontagne, Anthony DORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony D orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Glass, Deborah C
Sim, Malcolm R
Journal name Journal of health & safety research & practice
Volume number 2
Issue number 1
Start page 17
End page 28
Total pages 12
Publisher Safety Institute of Australia Ltd
Place of publication Gladstone Park, Vic.
Publication date 2010
ISSN 1837-5030
Keyword(s) Occupational light vehicle use
Summary Previous occupational light vehicle research has concentrated on employees using cars. The aim of this study was to identify and characterise the total occupational light vehicle-user population and compare it with the privately-used light vehicle population. Occupational light vehicle and private light vehicle populations were identified through use-related 2003 registration categories from New South Wales Roads and Traffic Authority data. Key groups of occupational light vehicle registration variables were comparatively assessed as potential determinants of occupational light vehicleuser risks. These comparisons were expressed as odds ratios with 95% Confidence Intervals. The occupational light vehicle population vehicles (n=646,201) comprised 18% of all light vehicle registrations. A number of statistical differences emerge between the two populations. For instance, 86% of occupational light vehicle registrants were male versus 65% of private registrants, and 56% of the occupational users registered load shape vehicles versus 20% of the private registrants. Occupational light vehicles registered for farming or taxi use were more than six times more likely to belong to sole-traders than organisations. Sole-traders were nearly twice as likely to register light-trucks, and twice as likely to register older vehicles, than organisations. This study demonstrates that the occupational light vehicle user population is larger and more diverse than previously shown with characteristics likely to increase the relative risks of motor vehicle crashes. More occupational light vehicles were load shapes and therefore likely to have poorer crashworthiness ratings than cars. Occupational light vehicles are frequently used by sole-traders for activities with increased OHS risks including farming and taxi use. Further exploration of occupational light vehicle-user crash risks should include all vehicle types, work arrangements and small ‘fleets’.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, Safety Institute of Australia Ltd
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30061289

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.