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Job stress as a preventable upstream determinant of common mental disorders: a review for practitioners and policy-makers

LaMontagne, Anthony D, Keegel, Tessa, Louie, Amber M and Ostry, Aleck 2010, Job stress as a preventable upstream determinant of common mental disorders: a review for practitioners and policy-makers, Advances in mental health, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 17-35.

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Title Job stress as a preventable upstream determinant of common mental disorders: a review for practitioners and policy-makers
Author(s) LaMontagne, Anthony DORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony D orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Keegel, Tessa
Louie, Amber M
Ostry, Aleck
Journal name Advances in mental health
Volume number 9
Issue number 1
Start page 17
End page 35
Total pages 19
Publisher eContent Management Pty Ltd
Place of publication Sippy Downs, Qld.
Publication date 2010
ISSN 1838-7357
1837-4905
Keyword(s) Job stress
Mental health
Depression
Anxiety
Intervention
Prevention
Health inequalities
Summary There is growing recognition of the important role of mental health in the workforce and in the workplace. At the same time, there has been a rapid growth of studies linking job stress and other psychosocial working conditions to common mental disorders, and a corresponding increase in public concern media attention to job stress and its impact upon worker health and well-being. This article provides a summary of the relevant scientific and medical literature on this topic for practitioners and policy-makers. It presents a primer on job stress concepts, an overview of the evidence linking job stress and common mental disorders, a summary of the intervention research on ways to prevent and control job stress, and a discussion of the strengths and weakness of the evidence base. We conclude that there is strong evidence linking job stress and common mental disorders, and that it is a substantial problem on the population level. On a positive note, however, the job stress intervention evidence also shows that the problem is preventable and can be effectively addressed by a combination of work- and worker-directed intervention.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30061290

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Health and Social Development
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