Does workplace social capital buffer the effects of job stress? A cross-sectional, multilevel analysis of cigarette smoking among U.S. manufacturing workers

Sapp, Amy L, Kawachi, Ichiro, Sorensen, Glorian, LaMontagne, Anthony D and Subramanian, SV 2010, Does workplace social capital buffer the effects of job stress? A cross-sectional, multilevel analysis of cigarette smoking among U.S. manufacturing workers, Journal of occupational and environmental medicine, vol. 52, no. 7, pp. 740-750, doi: 10.1097/JOM.0b013e3181e80842.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Does workplace social capital buffer the effects of job stress? A cross-sectional, multilevel analysis of cigarette smoking among U.S. manufacturing workers
Author(s) Sapp, Amy L
Kawachi, Ichiro
Sorensen, Glorian
LaMontagne, Anthony DORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony D orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Subramanian, SV
Journal name Journal of occupational and environmental medicine
Volume number 52
Issue number 7
Start page 740
End page 750
Total pages 11
Publisher Lippincott Williams and Wilkins
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA
Publication date 2010
ISSN 1076-2752
1536-5948
Summary Objective: To investigate whether workplace social capital buffers the association between job stress and smoking status. Methods: As part of the Harvard Cancer Prevention Project's Healthy Directions—Small Business Study, interviewer-administered questionnaires were completed by 1740 workers and 288 managers in 26 manufacturing firms (84% and 85% response). Social capital was assessed by multiple items measured at the individual level among workers and contextual level among managers. Job stress was operationalized by the demand-control model. Multilevel logistic regression was used to estimate associations between job stressors and smoking and test for effect modification by social capital measures. Results: Workplace social capital (both summary measures) buffered associations between high job demands and smoking. One compositional item—worker trust in managers—buffered associations between job strain and smoking. Conclusion: Workplace social capital may modify the effects of psychosocial working conditions on health behaviors.
Language eng
DOI 10.1097/JOM.0b013e3181e80842
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30061292

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 33 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 38 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 376 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 06 Mar 2014, 11:24:44 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.