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Estimating fatality rates in occupational light vehicle users using vehicle registration and crash data

Stuckey, Rwth, LaMontagne, Anthony D, Glass, Deborah C and Sim, Malcolm R 2010, Estimating fatality rates in occupational light vehicle users using vehicle registration and crash data, Australian and New Zealand journal of public health, vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 142-145, doi: 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2010.00498.x.

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Title Estimating fatality rates in occupational light vehicle users using vehicle registration and crash data
Author(s) Stuckey, Rwth
LaMontagne, Anthony DORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony D orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Glass, Deborah C
Sim, Malcolm R
Journal name Australian and New Zealand journal of public health
Volume number 34
Issue number 2
Start page 142
End page 145
Total pages 4
Publisher Public Health Association of Australia Inc
Place of publication Deakin, ACT
Publication date 2010
ISSN 1326-0200
Keyword(s) Light vehicles
Occupational driving
Work fatalities
Non-traditional work arrangements
Summary Objective: To estimate occupational light vehicle (OLV) fatality numbers using vehicle registration and crash data and compare these with previous estimates based on workers' compensation data. Method: New South Wales (NSW) Roads and Traffic Authority (RTA) vehicle registration and crash data were obtained for 2004. NSW is the only Australian jurisdiction with mandatory work-use registration, which was used as a proxy for work-relatedness. OLV fatality rates based on registration data as the denominator were calculated and comparisons made with published 2003/04 fatalities based on workers' compensation data. Results: Thirty-four NSW RTA OLV-user fatalities were identified, a rate of 4.5 deaths per 100,000 organisationally registered OLV, whereas the Australian Safety and Compensation Council (ASCC), reported 28 OLV deaths Australia-wide. Conclusions: More OLV user fatalities were identified from vehicle registration-based data than those based on workers' compensation estimates and the data are likely to provide an improved estimate of fatalities specific to OLV use. Implications: OLV-use is an important cause of traumatic fatalities that would be better identified through the use of vehicle-registration data, which provides a stronger evidence base from which to develop policy responses.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2010.00498.x
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, Public Health Association of Australia
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30061293

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.