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Unwanted sexual advances at work: variations by employment arrangement in a sample of working Australians

LaMontagne, Anthony D, Smith, Peter M, Louie, Amber M, Quinlan, Michael, Shoveller, Jean and Ostry, Aleck S 2009, Unwanted sexual advances at work: variations by employment arrangement in a sample of working Australians, Australian and New Zealand journal of public health, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 173-179, doi: 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2009.00366.x.

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Title Unwanted sexual advances at work: variations by employment arrangement in a sample of working Australians
Author(s) LaMontagne, Anthony DORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony D orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Smith, Peter M
Louie, Amber M
Quinlan, Michael
Shoveller, Jean
Ostry, Aleck S
Journal name Australian and New Zealand journal of public health
Volume number 33
Issue number 2
Start page 173
End page 179
Total pages 7
Publisher Public Health Association of Australia Inc.
Place of publication Deakin, ACT
Publication date 2009
ISSN 1326-0200
Keyword(s) Precarious employment
Unwanted sexual advances
Sexual harassment
Psychosocial work environment
Summary Objective: We tested the hypothesis that the risk of experiencing unwanted sexual advances at work (UWSA) is greater for precariously-employed workers in comparison to those in permanent or continuing employment. Methods: A cross-sectional population-based telephone survey was conducted in Victoria (66% response rate, N=1,101). Employment arrangements were analysed using eight differentiated categories, as well as a four-category collapsed measure to address small cell sizes. Self-report of unwanted sexual advances at work was modelled using multiple logistic regression in relation to employment arrangement, controlling for gender, age, and occupational skill level. Results: Forty-seven respondents reported UWSA in our sample (4.3%), mainly among women (37 of 47). Risk of UWSA was higher for younger respondents, but did not vary significantly by occupational skill level or education. In comparison to Permanent Full-Time, three employment arrangements were strongly associated with UWSA after adjustment for age, gender, and occupational skill level: Casual Full-Time OR = 7.2 (95% Confidence Interval 1.7-30.2); Fixed-Term Contract OR = 11.4 (95% CI 3.4-38.8); and Own-Account Self-Employed OR = 3.8 (95% CI 1.2-11.7). In analyses of females only, the magnitude of these associations was further increased. Conclusions: Respondents employed in precarious arrangements were more likely to report being exposed to UWSA, even after adjustment for age and gender. Implications: Greater protections from UWSA are likely needed for precariously employed workers.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2009.00366.x
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, Public Health Association of Australia
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30061295

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.