Job strain exposures vs. stress-related workers’ compensation claims in Victoria, Australia: developing a public health response to job stress

Keegel, Tessa, Ostry, Aleck and LaMontagne, Anthony D 2009, Job strain exposures vs. stress-related workers’ compensation claims in Victoria, Australia: developing a public health response to job stress, Journal of Public Health Policy, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 17-39, doi: 10.1057/jphp.2008.41.

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Title Job strain exposures vs. stress-related workers’ compensation claims in Victoria, Australia: developing a public health response to job stress
Author(s) Keegel, Tessa
Ostry, Aleck
LaMontagne, Anthony DORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony D orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Journal name Journal of Public Health Policy
Volume number 30
Issue number 1
Start page 17
End page 39
Total pages 23
Publisher Palgrave Macmillan Ltd.
Place of publication Basingstoke, UK
Publication date 2009
ISSN 0197-5897
1745-655X
Keyword(s) Job strain
Job stress
Policy
Workers’ compensation
Summary We present a comparative analysis of patterns of exposure to job stressors and stress-related workers’ compensation (WC) claims to provide an evaluation of the adequacy of claims-driven policy and practice. We assessed job strain prevalence in a 2003 population-based survey of Victorian [Australia] workers and compared these results with stress-related WC statistics for the same year. Job strain prevalence was higher among females than males, and elevated among lower vs. higher occupational skill levels. In comparison, claims were higher among females than males, but primarily among higher skill-level workers. There was some congruence between exposure and WC claims patterns. Highly exposed groups in lower socio-economic positions were underrepresented in claims statistics, suggesting that the WC insurance perspective substantially underestimates the job stress problems for these groups. Thus to provide a sufficient evidence base for equitable policy and practice responses to this growing public health problem, exposure or health outcome data are needed as an essential complement to claims statistics.
Language eng
DOI 10.1057/jphp.2008.41
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30061296

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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