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Distribution of physical activity facilities in Scotland by small area measures of deprivation and urbanicity

Lamb, Karen E, Ferguson, Neil S, Wang, Yang, Ogilvie, David and Ellaway, Anne 2010, Distribution of physical activity facilities in Scotland by small area measures of deprivation and urbanicity, International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, vol. 7, no. Article 76, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1186/1479-5868-7-76.

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Title Distribution of physical activity facilities in Scotland by small area measures of deprivation and urbanicity
Author(s) Lamb, Karen EORCID iD for Lamb, Karen E orcid.org/0000-0001-9782-8450
Ferguson, Neil S
Wang, Yang
Ogilvie, David
Ellaway, Anne
Journal name International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Volume number 7
Issue number Article 76
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, UK
Publication date 2010
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) Scotland
Physical activity facilities
Deprivation
Urbanicity
Summary Background The aim of this study was to examine the distribution of physical activity facilities by area-level deprivation in Scotland, adjusting for differences in urbanicity, and exploring differences between and within the four largest Scottish cities. Methods We obtained a list of all recreational physical activity facilities in Scotland. These were mapped and assigned to datazones. Poisson and negative binomial regression models were used to investigate associations between the number of physical activity facilities relative to population size and quintile of area-level deprivation. Results The results showed that prior to adjustment for urbanicity, the density of all facilities lessened with increasing deprivation from quintiles 2 to 5. After adjustment for urbanicity and local authority, the effect of deprivation remained significant but the pattern altered, with datazones in quintile 3 having the highest estimated mean density of facilities. Within-city associations were identified between the number of physical activity facilities and area-level deprivation in Aberdeen and Dundee, but not in Edinburgh or Glasgow. Conclusions In conclusion, area-level deprivation appears to have a significant association with the density of physical activity facilities and although overall no clear pattern was observed, affluent areas had fewer publicly owned facilities than more deprived areas but a greater number of privately owned facilities.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-7-76
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, BioMed Central
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30061313

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.