You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Area-level unemployment and perceived job insecurity: evidence from a longitudinal survey conducted in the Australian working-age population

Milner, Allison, Kavanagh, Anne, Krnjacki, Lauren, Bentley, Rebecca and LaMontagne, Anthony D 2014, Area-level unemployment and perceived job insecurity: evidence from a longitudinal survey conducted in the Australian working-age population, Annals of occupational hygiene, vol. 58, no. 2, pp. 171-181, doi: 10.1093/annhyg/met066.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
lamontagne-arealevel-2014.pdf Published version application/pdf 741.39KB 160

Title Area-level unemployment and perceived job insecurity: evidence from a longitudinal survey conducted in the Australian working-age population
Author(s) Milner, Allison
Kavanagh, Anne
Krnjacki, Lauren
Bentley, Rebecca
LaMontagne, Anthony DORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony D orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Journal name Annals of occupational hygiene
Volume number 58
Issue number 2
Start page 171
End page 181
Total pages 11
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Oxford, UK
Publication date 2014
ISSN 1475-3162
0003-4878
Keyword(s) Area-based factors
job insecurity
multi-level model
unemployment
working conditions
Summary Research significance: Job insecurity, the subjective individual anticipation of involuntary job loss, negatively affects employees’ health and their engagement. Although the relationship between job insecurity and health has been extensively studied, job insecurity as an ‘exposure’ has received far less attention, with little known about the upstream determinants of job insecurity in particular. This research sought to identify the relationship between self-rated job insecurity and area-level unemployment using a longitudinal, nationally representative study of Australian households. Methods: Mixed-effect multi-level regression models were used to assess the relationship between area-based unemployment rates and self-reported job insecurity using data from a longitudinal, nationally representative survey running since 2001. Interaction terms were included to test the hypotheses that the relationship between area-level unemployment and job insecurity differed between occupational skill-level groups and by employment arrangement. Marginal effects were computed to visually depict differences in job insecurity across areas with different levels of unemployment. Results: Results indicated that areas with the lowest unemployment rates had significantly lower job insecurity (predicted value 2.74; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.71–2.78, P < 0.001) than areas with higher unemployment (predicted value 2.81; 95% CI 2.79–2.84, P < 0.001). There was a stronger relationship between area-level unemployment and job insecurity among precariously and fixed-term employed workers than permanent workers. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate the independent influences of prevailing economic conditions, individual- and job-level factors on job insecurity. Persons working on a casual basis or on a fixed-term contract in areas with higher levels of unemployment are more susceptible to feelings of job insecurity than those working permanently.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/annhyg/met066
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30061374

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 8 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 7 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 263 Abstract Views, 161 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 06 Mar 2014, 11:43:36 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.