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Leave entitlements, time off work and the household financial impacts of quarantine compliance during an H1N1 outbreak

Kavanagh, Anne M, Mason, Kate E, Bentley, Rebecca J, Studdert, David M, McVernon, Jodie, Fielding, James E, Petrony, Sylvia, Gurrin, Lyle and LaMontagne, Anthony D 2012, Leave entitlements, time off work and the household financial impacts of quarantine compliance during an H1N1 outbreak, BMC Infectious diseases, vol. 12, no. Article 311, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1186/1471-2334-12-311.

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Title Leave entitlements, time off work and the household financial impacts of quarantine compliance during an H1N1 outbreak
Author(s) Kavanagh, Anne M
Mason, Kate E
Bentley, Rebecca J
Studdert, David M
McVernon, Jodie
Fielding, James E
Petrony, Sylvia
Gurrin, Lyle
LaMontagne, Anthony DORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony D orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Journal name BMC Infectious diseases
Volume number 12
Issue number Article 311
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, UK
Publication date 2012
ISSN 1471-2334
Keyword(s) Leave entitlements
Time off work
Financial impacts
Quarantine compliance
H1N1 outbreak
Summary Background The Australian state of Victoria, with 5.2 million residents, enforced home quarantine during a H1N1 pandemic in 2009. The strategy was targeted at school children. The objective of this study was to investigate the extent to which parents’ access to paid sick leave or paid carer’s leave was associated with (a) time taken off work to care for quarantined children, (b) household finances, and (c) compliance with quarantine recommendations. Methods We conducted an online and telephone survey of households recruited through 33 schools (85% of eligible schools), received 314 responses (27%), and analysed the subsample of 133 households in which all resident parents were employed. Results In 52% of households, parents took time off work to care for quarantined children. Households in which no resident parent had access to leave appeared to be less likely to take time off work (42% vs 58%, p=0.08) although this difference had only borderline significance. Among parents who did take time off work, those in households without access to leave were more likely to lose pay (73% vs 21%, p<0.001). Of the 26 households in which a parent lost pay due to taking time off work, 42% experienced further financial consequences such as being unable to pay a bill. Access to leave did not predict compliance with quarantine recommendations. Conclusions Future pandemic plans should consider the economic costs borne by households and options for compensating quarantined families for income losses.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1471-2334-12-311
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, BioMed Central
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30061390

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.