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Maternal supplementation with LGG reduces vaccine-specific immune responses in infants at high-risk of developing allergic disease

Licciardi, Paul V, Ismail, Intan H, Balloch, Anne, Mui, Milton, Hoe, Edwin, Lamb, Karen and Tang, Mimi L K 2013, Maternal supplementation with LGG reduces vaccine-specific immune responses in infants at high-risk of developing allergic disease, Frontiers in Immunology, vol. 4, no. 381, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.3389/fimmu.2013.00381.

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Title Maternal supplementation with LGG reduces vaccine-specific immune responses in infants at high-risk of developing allergic disease
Author(s) Licciardi, Paul V
Ismail, Intan H
Balloch, Anne
Mui, Milton
Hoe, Edwin
Lamb, KarenORCID iD for Lamb, Karen orcid.org/0000-0001-9782-8450
Tang, Mimi L K
Journal name Frontiers in Immunology
Volume number 4
Issue number 381
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher Frontiers
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2013
ISSN 1664-3224
Keyword(s) Vaccine
LGG
Probiotic
Pneumococcal
Treg
Immune modulation
Summary Probiotics are defined as live micro-organisms that when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. Among their pleiotropic effects, inhibition of pathogen colonization at the mucosal surface as well as modulation of immune responses are widely recognized as the principal biological activities of probiotic bacteria. In recent times, the immune effects of probiotics have led to their application as vaccine adjuvants, offering a novel strategy for enhancing the efficacy of current vaccines. Such an approach is particularly relevant in regions where infectious disease burden is greatest and where access to complete vaccination programs is limited. In this study, we report the effects of the probiotic, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) on immune responses to tetanus, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and pneumococcal conjugate (PCV7) vaccines in infants. This study was conducted as part of a larger clinical trial assessing the impact of maternal LGG supplementation in preventing the development of atopic eczema in infants at high-risk for developing allergic disease. Maternal LGG supplementation was associated with reduced antibody responses against tetanus, Hib, and pneumococcal serotypes contained in PCV7 (N = 31) compared to placebo treatment (N = 30) but not total IgG levels. Maternal LGG supplementation was also associated with a trend to increased number of tetanus toxoid-specific T regulatory in the peripheral blood compared to placebo-treated infants. These findings suggest that maternal LGG supplementation may not be beneficial in terms of improving vaccine-specific immunity in infants. Further clinical studies are needed to confirm these findings. As probiotic immune effects can be species/strain specific, our findings do not exclude the potential use of other probiotic bacteria to modulate infant immune responses to vaccines.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fimmu.2013.00381
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Frontiers
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30061415

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.