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Sociospatial distribution of access to facilities for moderate and vigorous intensity physical activity in Scotland by different modes of transport

Lamb, Karen E, Ogilvie, David, Ferguson, Neil S, Murray, Jonathan, Wang, Yang and Ellaway, Anne 2012, Sociospatial distribution of access to facilities for moderate and vigorous intensity physical activity in Scotland by different modes of transport, International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, vol. 9, no. 55, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1186/1479-5868-9-55.

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Title Sociospatial distribution of access to facilities for moderate and vigorous intensity physical activity in Scotland by different modes of transport
Author(s) Lamb, Karen EORCID iD for Lamb, Karen E orcid.org/0000-0001-9782-8450
Ogilvie, David
Ferguson, Neil S
Murray, Jonathan
Wang, Yang
Ellaway, Anne
Journal name International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Volume number 9
Issue number 55
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, UK
Publication date 2012
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) Deprivation
Accessibility
Intensity
Recreational physical activity
Transport
Summary Background People living in neighbourhoods of lower socioeconomic status have been shown to have higher rates of obesity and a lower likelihood of meeting physical activity recommendations than their more affluent counterparts. This study examines the sociospatial distribution of access to facilities for moderate or vigorous intensity physical activity in Scotland and whether such access differs by the mode of transport available and by Urban Rural Classification. Methods A database of all fixed physical activity facilities was obtained from the national agency for sport in Scotland. Facilities were categorised into light, moderate and vigorous intensity activity groupings before being mapped. Transport networks were created to assess the number of each type of facility accessible from the population weighted centroid of each small area in Scotland on foot, by bicycle, by car and by bus. Multilevel modelling was used to investigate the distribution of the number of accessible facilities by small area deprivation within urban, small town and rural areas separately, adjusting for population size and local authority. Results Prior to adjustment for Urban Rural Classification and local authority, the median number of accessible facilities for moderate or vigorous intensity activity increased with increasing deprivation from the most affluent or second most affluent quintile to the most deprived for all modes of transport. However, after adjustment, the modelling results suggest that those in more affluent areas have significantly higher access to moderate and vigorous intensity facilities by car than those living in more deprived areas. Conclusions The sociospatial distributions of access to facilities for both moderate intensity and vigorous intensity physical activity were similar. However, the results suggest that those living in the most affluent neighbourhoods have poorer access to facilities of either type that can be reached on foot, by bicycle or by bus than those living in less affluent areas. This poorer access from the most affluent areas appears to be reversed for those with access to a car.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-9-55
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, BioMed Central
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30061418

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.