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Investigating the written English self-efficacy of gifted and non- gifted adolescents

Spicer, Claire 2007, Investigating the written English self-efficacy of gifted and non- gifted adolescents, PhD thesis, Faculty of Education, Melbourne University.


Title Investigating the written English self-efficacy of gifted and non- gifted adolescents
Author Spicer, Claire
Institution Melbourne University
School Faculty of Education
Degree name PhD
Thesis advisor Associate Professor John Munro
Associate Professor Kay Margetts
Date submitted 2007-11-30
Keyword(s) written English self-efficacy
verbally gifted
non verbally gifted students
Summary Self-efficacy is a belief. It can encourage or hamper students from learning to their full potential. Students who are efficacious are more motivated, more persistent to meet their goals and are more likely to take learning risks. The research into the self-efficacy of students classified as verbally or non-verbally gifted is in its infancy. This book details a Doctoral dissertation that investigated the written English self-efficacy of adolescent students. Results identified verbally gifted students had higher written English self-efficacy, were more intrinsically motivated, had higher levels of creativity and wrote superior essays compared to non-verbally gifted and non-gifted students. Findings highlighted differences between gender as female student?s recorded higher self-efficacy and written English performance scores and interestingly, students from lower socio-economic backgrounds reported higher self-efficacy compared to students from higher socio-economic backgrounds. Pedagogical implications are considered with teachers encouraged to realise the impact of self-efficacy upon student learning, motivation and persistence regardless of their academic ability.
Language eng
Field of Research 130399 Specialist Studies in Education not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 939999 Education and Training not elsewhere classified
Copyright notice ┬ęThe author
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30061442

Document type: Thesis
Collection: Alfred Deakin Research Institute
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Created: Thu, 06 Mar 2014, 20:58:18 EST by Claire Spicer

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