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Informing brain health behaviour choices: the efficacy of a high-school brain awareness pilot study

Broadbent, J, Sitka, N, Macfarlane, S, McGillivray, J and Tye, S 2014, Informing brain health behaviour choices: the efficacy of a high-school brain awareness pilot study, British Journal of Education, Society & Behavioural Science, vol. 4, no. 6, pp. 755-767.

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Title Informing brain health behaviour choices: the efficacy of a high-school brain awareness pilot study
Author(s) Broadbent, JORCID iD for Broadbent, J orcid.org/0000-0003-4045-2039
Sitka, N
Macfarlane, SORCID iD for Macfarlane, S orcid.org/0000-0002-8904-8945
McGillivray, JORCID iD for McGillivray, J orcid.org/0000-0003-2000-6488
Tye, S
Journal name British Journal of Education, Society & Behavioural Science
Volume number 4
Issue number 6
Start page 755
End page 767
Total pages 13
Publisher Sciencedomain International
Place of publication West Bengal, India
Publication date 2014
ISSN 2278-0998
Keyword(s) brain health
neuro-education
neuroscience
education
Summary Aims:
Lifestyle choices such as diet and exercise significantly impact mental wellbeing and this is particularly so during the period of adolescence. The aim of the current study was to determine whether neuroscience concepts could be introduced to the classroom in a manner that improved high school student awareness of how health behaviour choices impact brain health. 

Study Design:
This study was a quantitative study that measured 47 assertions relating to brain health and neuroscience pre and post an interactive seminar.

Place and Duration of Study:
A Victorian high school in Geelong, Australia. Participation in the seminar took approximately 100 minutes, including time to complete the questionnaires.

Methodology:
The current study trialed a ‘Brain Basics’ educational program in a Victorian high-school. The neuro-educative interactive seminar was presented to 48female year 11 students. The level of student understanding, interest and enjoyment was assessed prior to and following an interactive seminar.

Results:
Student understanding of brain health significantly improved in 31 out of 47 questionnaire items and interest and enjoyment were highly rated.

Conclusion:
This supports the notion that basic neuroscience concepts can be introduced into Victorian schools to increase brain health awareness of our youth during this criticaltime of brain development.
Language eng
Field of Research 170103 Educational Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30061589

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Created: Sat, 15 Mar 2014, 10:41:27 EST by Jaclyn Broadbent

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.