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Artworks : Water Table and Rain Table : presented as part of the Periscope Exhibition, Castlemaine State Festival

Armstrong, Daniel 2013, Artworks : Water Table and Rain Table : presented as part of the Periscope Exhibition, Castlemaine State Festival, Castlemaine State Festival : Periscope Exhibition, Castelamaine, Vic.

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Title Artworks : Water Table and Rain Table : presented as part of the Periscope Exhibition, Castlemaine State Festival
Creator(s) Armstrong, Daniel
Year presented 2013
Year created 2013
Description of artwork Water Table: Timber, steel, glass, water, digital images, electrical components. 2m x 600cm x 820 cm. Rain Table: Timber, Glass, steel, water, video,various electrical components. 1116cm x 116cm x 820cm
Publisher Castlemaine State Festival : Periscope Exhibition
Place of publication Castelamaine, Vic
Keyword(s) istallation Art
astronomy
galaxy
moon
Vesto Slipher
Galileo
Summary Rain Table and Water Table: Delicate splashes and droplets of water act like primitive lenses bringing transparency to the diffused images of celestial bodies. These two installation pieces are inspired by the beauty of the night sky and invite the viewer to consider the cosmos in relation to ones self and to contemplate the discoveries which have changed our understanding of the universe. Water Table and Rain Table are the two works being presented as part of Periscope. Through the form of the science bench or museum cabinet, luminous and projected images play against glass and water invoking the sublime sense of wonder that we have when we look to the starry night sky. Water Table - In 1912 the astronomer, Vesto Slipher made the discovery that “Nebula” were moving at incredible velocities due to the expansion of space itself. This discovery revealed these “Nebula” to be vastly remote and independent galaxies. Water Table speculates on the understanding that when we look into deep space, we also look into deep time. Rain Table is a new work produced for the festival and makes reference to the first telescopic observations of the Moon made by the mathematician, philosopher and astronomer, Galileo Galilei in 1610. The implication of Galileo’s observations gave rise to a radical new understanding of the heavens and our place in it and the final acceptance that the Earth was not the centre of the Universe.
Notes Works exhibited in the Periscope Exhibition at the Castlemaine State Festival. Hunt & Lobb Building, 78 Forest Street, Castlemaine, Vic. 15-24 March, 2013. A Public Artist's talk was given by Daniel Armstrong on Sunday 17 March from 12pm - 1pm. The festival attracted more than 20,000 visitors.
Language eng
Field of Research 190502 Fine Arts (incl Sculpture and Painting)
190503 Lens-based Practice
190504 Performance and Installation Art
Socio Economic Objective 950104 The Creative Arts (incl. Graphics and Craft)
HERDC Research category J1 Major original creative work
Copyright notice ©2013, The Artist
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30061601

 
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Created: Mon, 17 Mar 2014, 16:30:40 EST by Daniel Armstrong

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.