Landscapes in transition : local perceptions of indigenous and European settlement changes along the Victorian coast

Roos, Phillip B 2014, Landscapes in transition : local perceptions of indigenous and European settlement changes along the Victorian coast, in UHPH 2014 : Landscapes and ecologies of urban and planning history : Proceedings of the 12th Australasian Urban History Planning History Conference, Australasian Urban History / Planning History Group and Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand, pp. 665-682.

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Title Landscapes in transition : local perceptions of indigenous and European settlement changes along the Victorian coast
Author(s) Roos, Phillip BORCID iD for Roos, Phillip B orcid.org/0000-0002-5571-1059
Conference name Australasian Urban History Planning History. Conference (12th : 2014 : Wellington, New Zealand)
Conference location Wellington, New Zealand
Conference dates 2-5 Feb. 2014
Title of proceedings UHPH 2014 : Landscapes and ecologies of urban and planning history : Proceedings of the 12th Australasian Urban History Planning History Conference
Editor(s) Gjerde, Morten
Petrovic, Emina
Publication date 2014
Conference series Australasian Urban History Planning History Conference
Start page 665
End page 682
Total pages 18
Publisher Australasian Urban History / Planning History Group and Victoria University of Wellington
Place of publication Wellington, New Zealand
Keyword(s) Landscape Change
Indigenous Heritage
Place Character
Coastal Settlements
Urban Expansion
Generative Plan
Adaptation
Sense of Place
Summary Around the world coastal areas are witnessing dramatic changes due to the consequences of the growth of human settlements. Rapid urban expansion in coastal settlements due to ‘life style migration’ impacts negatively on environmental coastal amenities that are the driving factor behind the attraction of these areas. The Victorian Coast in Australia is under stress, with the growth pattern of coastal settlements in a sprawling linear fashion resulting in devastating effects on the natural coastal environment, biodiversity and the loss of cultural heritage. The Victorian coast is rich in history, and the coastal towns are often described in literature as places with ‘sense of place’, or referred to as place character. This place character has been formed over many years with the interaction between social histories and natural environments woven together across time. This paper reviews the transition of the landscapes along the Great Ocean Road coastal region, and ask the question how can a potential Generative Plan be developed to establish a process to keep the place character of coastal towns. The proposed plan considers the interrelationships of nature and people as fundamental to forming place character, from the time of Indigenous habitation before European settlement, to the current day of rapid increased developments scattered along this coast.
Language eng
Field of Research 120107 Landscape Architecture
120301 Design History and Theory
120504 Land Use and Environmental Planning
Socio Economic Objective 950305 Conserving Natural Heritage
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2014, Australasian Urban History / Planning History Group and Victoria University of Wellington
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30061621

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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