Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow : attempting to plan for coastal change in South West Victoria

Herron, Murray, Jones, David and Rollo, John 2014, Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow : attempting to plan for coastal change in South West Victoria, in UHPH 2014 : Landscapes and Ecologies of Urban and Planning History : Proceedings of the 12th Australasian Urban History Planning History Conference, Australasian Urban History / Planning History Group and Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand, pp. 179-193.

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Title Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow : attempting to plan for coastal change in South West Victoria
Author(s) Herron, Murray
Jones, David
Rollo, John
Conference name Australasian Urban History Planning History. Conference (12th : 2014 : Wellington, New Zealand)
Conference location Wellington, New Zealand
Conference dates 2-5 Feb. 2014
Title of proceedings UHPH 2014 : Landscapes and Ecologies of Urban and Planning History : Proceedings of the 12th Australasian Urban History Planning History Conference
Editor(s) Gjerde, Morten
Petrovic, Emina
Publication date 2014
Conference series Australasian Urban History Planning History Conference
Start page 179
End page 193
Total pages 15
Publisher Australasian Urban History / Planning History Group and Victoria University of Wellington
Place of publication Wellington, New Zealand
Keyword(s) coastal planning
urban design
South-Western Victoria
Summary Learn from yesterday, live for today hope for tomorrow. When Albert Einstein penned these opening words, the realm of planning was least on his mind despite the aptness of the thoughts. This paper, having regard to this quotation, questions whether demographic change in one coastal area is occurring at a faster rate than in non–coastal areas? The South West coastal area of Victoria, from 1981 onwards, has witnessed a dramatic increase in population and also major shifts in the social and economic characteristics of the region. What have been the historic demographic and employment characteristics of the area and has there been a shift in these characteristics leading to the rapid population growth? These questions are considered using the City of Warrnambool, the largest urban centre in South West Victoria, as a study vehicle. The impact of a growing population on the municipal landscape can be demanding in terms of land use planning, land supply and the urban design. This paper will review the population growth using a shift share analysis method compared against overall growth patterns in the Victorian state population and Australia overall. It will then examine government population forecasts for the City of Warrnambool and suggest those impacts upon the current City of Warrnambool landscape.
Language eng
Field of Research 129999 Built Environment and Design not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E2 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
Copyright notice ©2014, Australasian Urban History / Planning History Group and Victoria University of Wellington
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30061631

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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