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Grain excretion by goats fed whole or processed cereals with various roughages

McGregor, B.A. and Whiting, C.J. 2013, Grain excretion by goats fed whole or processed cereals with various roughages, Small ruminant research, vol. 115, no. 1-3, pp. 21-28, doi: 10.1016/j.smallrumres.2013.08.009.

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Title Grain excretion by goats fed whole or processed cereals with various roughages
Author(s) McGregor, B.A.
Whiting, C.J.
Journal name Small ruminant research
Volume number 115
Issue number 1-3
Start page 21
End page 28
Total pages 8
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2013-10
ISSN 0921-4488
Keyword(s) angora goats
associative effects
barley
digestion
oats
ration composition
roughage quality
starch
supplementary feeding
Summary Despite cereal grains being grown on 5 continents where goats are kept, there is little information on the excretion of whole cereal grains when fed to goats. We determined the effects of various dietary treatments on whole grain and starch loss in the faeces of Angora goats. In Experiment 1 there were 4 replicates of the factorial design: (a) 2 grain types (barley, oats); (b) whole grain or processing (milled barley or rolled oats); (c) 2 roughage qualities (Persian clover hay, barley straw); and (d) 2 feeding levels (level 1, 150 g/d of grain, 250 g/d of roughage; level 2, 250 g/d of grain, ad libitum roughage). In Experiment 2, which immediately followed Experiment 1, and aimed to detect carry over effects of previous feeding of barley straw and grain processing, feed levels were either 650 g/d grain or 400 g/d grain with 550 g/d Persian clover hay. Data were analysed by ANOVA. In Experiment 1, processing had no effect on digestible dry matter intake. The number of whole grains lost per 100 g of fresh faeces and whole grains loss as the % of grain dry matter intake were affected by an interaction between processing and roughage quality. Whole grain fed with Persian clover hay had greater grain loss than all other diets. Whole grain loss was greater with whole grain than with processed grain. Level of feeding had no effects on grain loss. In Experiment 2, more whole grains were lost in fresh faeces when fed with Persian clover hay than when fed without hay, an effect of previous feeding with barley straw reduced whole grain excretion, and more barley grains were lost than oat grain. Faecal starch was affected, with higher levels when whole barley grain was fed, particularly with Persian clover hay, or when previously fed barley straw at a high level. Feeding grain at 650 g/d did not increase grain or starch excretion. Whole grains represented a small loss of grain dry matter intake in faeces, averaging 0.8% with a maximum recorded of 2.6%. Faecal concentration of the whole grains may be altered by grain size and the digestibility of the roughage component of the diet. In this study an additional cost of 3% for processing grains would not have provided economic benefits.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.smallrumres.2013.08.009
Field of Research 109999 Technology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970110 Expanding Knowledge in Technology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Elsevier
Free to Read? Yes
Free to Read Start Date 2014-11-01
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30061705

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Institute for Frontier Materials
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.