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Secondary English in the Australian curriculum: Tasmanian teachers’ perceptions of implementation – a conceptual overview

Moran, Amanda, Budd, Yoshi, Allen, Jeanne and Williamson, John 2014, Secondary English in the Australian curriculum: Tasmanian teachers’ perceptions of implementation – a conceptual overview. In Fitzallen, Noleine, Reaburn, Robyn and Fan, Si (ed), The future of educational research: perspectives from beginning researchers, Sense Publishers, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, pp.53-66.

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Title Secondary English in the Australian curriculum: Tasmanian teachers’ perceptions of implementation – a conceptual overview
Author(s) Moran, Amanda
Budd, Yoshi
Allen, Jeanne
Williamson, John
Title of book The future of educational research: perspectives from beginning researchers
Editor(s) Fitzallen, Noleine
Reaburn, Robyn
Fan, Si
Publication date 2014
Series Bold visions in educational research; v. 37
Chapter number 5
Total chapters 25
Start page 53
End page 66
Total pages 14
Publisher Sense Publishers
Place of Publication Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Keyword(s) Australian curriculum
teacher perceptions
Tasmanian school education
Summary Australian school curricula are currently being reformed with the nation-wide introduction of the Australian Curriculum, designed to bring national subject content and assessment standard conformity through the detailing of the “core knowledge, understanding, skills and general capabilities [that are deemed] important for all Australian students” (Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority [ACARA], 2008). The reform and implementation of any curriculum requires well- structured planning, and at the school level, curriculum implementation requires the input of teachers – the frontline stakeholders. Research suggests that the implementation of a new curriculum requires concentrated support to ensure that teachers are able to work and progress through professional learning effectively (Mulford, 2008; Australian Curriculum Coalition, 2010). This chapter is presented in two parts: a discussion about the incoming Australian Curriculum: English, and an outline of a proposed qualitative case study that will examine English teachers’ perceptions of the implementation of the Australian Curriculum: English in Tasmania.
ISBN 9462095108
9789462095106
Language eng
Field of Research 130204 English and Literacy Curriculum and Pedagogy (excl LOTE, ESL and TESOL)
Socio Economic Objective 930301 Assessment and Evaluation of Curriculum
HERDC Research category B1 Book chapter
Copyright notice ©2014, Sense Publishers
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30061935

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Created: Wed, 26 Mar 2014, 06:44:09 EST by Jeanne Allen

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.