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The occupiers' burden: tackling food shortage and related health problems in post-war Germany 1945-47

Slaveski, Filip 2013, The occupiers' burden: tackling food shortage and related health problems in post-war Germany 1945-47. In Lumey, LH and Vaiserman, Alexander (ed), Early life nutrition and adult health and development: lessons from changing dietary patterns, famines, and experimental studies, Nova Science Publishers, New York, N.Y., pp.187-206.

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Title The occupiers' burden: tackling food shortage and related health problems in post-war Germany 1945-47
Author(s) Slaveski, Filip
Title of book Early life nutrition and adult health and development: lessons from changing dietary patterns, famines, and experimental studies
Editor(s) Lumey, LH
Vaiserman, Alexander
Publication date 2013
Chapter number 9
Total chapters 9
Start page 187
End page 206
Total pages 20
Publisher Nova Science Publishers
Place of Publication New York, N.Y.
Keyword(s) Soviet Union
Germany
Occupation
Famine
Post-war
Summary The end of the Second World War brought much relief to its combatants, but a range of problems remained that would plague post-war Europe for years to come. Chief among them was food shortage. The breakdown of agricultural systems, essential services, and the state itself laid fertile ground for food shortage to develop in parts of post-war Germany occupied by the victorious powers. There is much to be gained from comparing the occupiers’ responses to this Horseman of the Apocalypse. The most fruitful comparison lies between the Soviets and British. Unlike the Americans whose economic might in the post-war period allowed them to better feed and supply Germans living in their occupation zone, domestic economic weaknesses hamstrung both Soviet and British responses to the more severe advent of food shortage which confronted them. Their responses were very different—some successful, others not—but all instructive for understanding the impacts of natural and policy factors on the development of food shortage and the consequences to the health of the population. The variety of these impacts have been obscured by the absence of this comparison in the literature, which is now made more feasible by the greater availability of the extensive resources that each occupier devoted to recording food and health data, particularly in the Soviet case. The data is not only relevant to the occupation period from 1945 to 1949, as it suggests long-term health impacts on those most exposed to the risk of food shortage then, and most at risk to the consequences of malnutrition decades later. In fact, as the available data defines regional differences in food rations and, accordingly, comparative food shortages in Soviet and British occupation zones, the situation in post-war Germany provides an excellent platform for future research linking differences in early nutrition to adult health outcomes.
ISBN 9781624171291
Language eng
Field of Research 210307 European History (excl British, Classical Greek and Roman)
Socio Economic Objective 970121 Expanding Knowledge in History and Archaeology
HERDC Research category B1.1 Book chapter
HERDC collection year 2013
Copyright notice ©2013, Nova Science Publishers
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30061978

Document type: Book Chapter
Collections: Alfred Deakin Research Institute
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Created: Thu, 27 Mar 2014, 11:12:47 EST by Filip Slaveski

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.