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Healthcare professionals’ use of mobile phones and the internet in clinical practice

Koehler, Nicole, Vujovic, Olga and McMenamin, Christine 2013, Healthcare professionals’ use of mobile phones and the internet in clinical practice, Journal of mobile technology in medicine, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 3-13, doi: 10.7309/jmtm.76.

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Title Healthcare professionals’ use of mobile phones and the internet in clinical practice
Author(s) Koehler, Nicole
Vujovic, Olga
McMenamin, Christine
Journal name Journal of mobile technology in medicine
Volume number 2
Issue number 1
Start page 3
End page 13
Total pages 11
Publisher JMTM
Place of publication Washington, D. C.
Publication date 2013-03
ISSN 1839-7808
Keyword(s) healthcare professionals
mobile phones
internet
clinical practice
Summary Background: Over the last few years mobile phone applications have been designed for healthcare professionals. However, little is known in regards to healthcare professionals’ use of and attitudes towards using smartphones (and applications) within clinical practice. Thus the aims of the present study were to enumerate the number of healthcare professionals that use mobile phones within clinical practice and their attitudes towards using them. Furthermore, given that the internet preceded smartphones, we also established healthcare professionals’ attitudes towards internet use in clinical practice as a comparison.

Method: Forty-three healthcare professionals from a range of disciplines and specialities who were predominantly working in Australia completed an anonymous online survey. 

Results: Ninety-one per cent of healthcare professionals owned a mobile phone of which 87% used it during clinical practice. No healthcare professional was supplied with a smartphone by their clinical/healthcare workplace. Consequently they used their privately owned device. For ten out of eleven analogous statements healthcare professionals had significantly more positive attitudes towards internet than mobile phone use in clinical practice. However, attitudes for eight of the ten statements pertaining to mobile phone use were positive. Mobile phones were perceived negatively in regard to confidentiality. Furthermore, healthcare professionals’ also had the perception that patients may think  that they are using their mobile for non-medical purposes.

Conclusion: Mobiles, including smartphones, are commonly used within clinical practice and at present most healthcare professionals use their privately owned device. Despite healthcare professionals having more positive attitudes toward internet use, their attitudes towards mobile use were largely positive. Our results suggest that mobile phone use, in particular smartphone use, within clinical practice is likely to increase in the future. 
Language eng
DOI 10.7309/jmtm.76
Field of Research 139999 Education not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Journal of mobile technology in medicine
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30062056

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Learning Services
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.