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The effect of an early childhood obesity intervention on father's obesity risk behaviors: the Melbourne InFANT program

Walsh, Adam, Lioret Suteau, Sandrine, Cameron, Adrian, Hesketh, Kylie, McNaughton, Sarah, Crawford, David and Campbell, Karen 2014, The effect of an early childhood obesity intervention on father's obesity risk behaviors: the Melbourne InFANT program, International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, vol. 11, no. 1, Article 18, pp. 1-9.

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Title The effect of an early childhood obesity intervention on father's obesity risk behaviors: the Melbourne InFANT program
Author(s) Walsh, Adam
Lioret Suteau, Sandrine
Cameron, Adrian
Hesketh, Kylie
McNaughton, Sarah
Crawford, David
Campbell, Karen
Journal name International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Volume number 11
Issue number 1
Season Article 18
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, UK
Publication date 2014
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) Fathers
Dietary patterns
Physical activity
Sedentary behaviour
Childhood
Summary Background
To investigate the effect of an early childhood obesity prevention intervention, incorporating a parent modelling component, on fathers’ obesity risk-related behaviours.

Methods

Cluster randomized-controlled trial in the setting of pre-existing first-time parents groups organised by Maternal and Child Health Nurses in Victoria, Australia. Participants were 460 first-time fathers mean age = 34.2 (s.d.4.90) years. Dietary pattern scores of fathers were derived using principal component analysis, total physical activity and total television viewing time were assessed at baseline (infant aged three to four months) and after 15 months.

Results
No significant beneficial intervention effect was observed on fathers’ dietary pattern scores, total physical activity or total television viewing time.

Conclusion

Despite a strong focus on parent modelling (targeting parents own diet, physical activity and television viewing behaviours), and beneficial impact on mothers’ obesity risk behaviours, this intervention, with mothers as the point of contact, had no effect on fathers’ obesity risk-related behaviours. Based on the established links between children’s obesity risk-related behaviors and that of their fathers, a need exists for research testing the effectiveness of interventions with a stronger engagement of fathers.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, BioMed Central
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30062132

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.