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Describing socioeconomic gradients in children's diets - does the socioeconomic indicators used matter?

Zarnowiecki, Dorota, Ball, Kylie, Parletta, Natalie and Dollman, James 2014, Describing socioeconomic gradients in children's diets - does the socioeconomic indicators used matter?, International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 11, no. 44, doi: 10.1186/1479-5868-11-44.

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Title Describing socioeconomic gradients in children's diets - does the socioeconomic indicators used matter?
Author(s) Zarnowiecki, Dorota
Ball, KylieORCID iD for Ball, Kylie orcid.org/0000-0003-2893-8415
Parletta, Natalie
Dollman, James
Journal name International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 11
Issue number 44
Total pages 12
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2014-03-28
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) socioeconomic position
children
diet
fruit
vegetables
non-core food
sweet drinks
Summary Background
Children of low socioeconomic position (SEP) generally have poorer diets than children of high SEP. However there is no consensus on which SEP variable is most indicative of SEP differences in children’s diets. This study investigated associations between diet and various SEP indicators among children aged 9–13 years.

Method:
Families (n = 625) were recruited from 27 Adelaide primary schools in 2010. Children completed semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaires providing intake scores for fruit, vegetables, non-core foods, sweetened drinks, and healthy and unhealthy eating behaviours. Parents reported demographic information by telephone interview. Differences in dietary intake scores were compared across parental education, income, occupation, employment status and home postcode.

Results:
Across most SEP indicators, lower SEP was associated with poorer dietary outcomes, including higher intake of non-core foods and sweetened drinks, and more unhealthy behaviours; and lower intake of fruit and vegetables, and fewer healthy behaviours. The number and type of significant SEP-diet associations differed across SEP indicators and dietary outcomes. Mother’s education appeared most frequently as a predictor of children’s dietary intake, and postcode was the least frequent predictor of children’s dietary intake.

Conclusion:
Socioeconomic gradients in children’s dietary intake varied according to the SEP indicator used, suggesting indicator-specific pathways of influence on children’s dietary intake. Researchers should consider multiple indicators when defining SEP in relation to children’s eating.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-11-44
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, BioMed Central
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30062432

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Created: Tue, 08 Apr 2014, 12:54:39 EST by Jane Moschetti

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.